How Manager Feedback and Interview Evaluations Improve Hiring in 2020

How Manager Feedback and Interview Evaluations Improve Hiring in 2020

Updated February 17, 2020

If you aren’t using candidate evaluation forms, you aren’t collaborating effectively.

Candidate Evaluation Forms For Interview Feedback

What is a candidate evaluation form? It’s a tool that allows members of the hiring team to rate applicants based on the same criteria.

8 Ways Candidate Evaluation Forms Improve Recruiting

1. It ensures each interviewer is thorough in their evaluation
2. It speeds up the interview feedback process
3. It helps prevent bias in job interview evaluation
4. It measures hard and soft skills
5. It simplifies collaboration among your hiring team
6. It helps differentiate candidates with near-identical qualifications
7. It saves time when first-round rejected candidates are considered for future positions
8. The systemized scoring increases the usefulness of your talent pipeline database

The Interview Feedback Review Process

How do you evaluate candidates without a systematic way to rate them?

Let’s consider a common scenario.

You currently have a mission-critical position to fill and a fairly tight deadline to hire a qualified person. You have posted the position on your website and other outside resources like Monster, CareerBuilder, Indeed and Craigslist.

What comes next is a stack of resumes. Followed by the interview process. In 2020, you’re competing with many other companies to find the best talent. You can’t afford a slowdown in your process.

The top candidate could be hired by your competitor. The most desirable candidates are off the market in 10 days.

But you need to proceed strategically so you don’t hire the wrong person.

You pick up the first resume and encounter some mission statements like…

  • “Motivated individual seeks challenging position for personal and professional growth”
  • “Industry expert and thought leader available to implement revenue-ramping methodologies.”
  • “Professional guru with proven track record of driving key performance metrics seeks next challenging opportunity.”

…and you then proceed to read through four more pages of the resume.

Buried in the resume amid the industry keywords and buzzwords is the information that is relevant to your open position. After reading about 10 of these resumes, you can’t remember which candidate had which qualifications. It’s a good idea to organize the applicants into categories like “Unqualified”, “Potential” and “Top Prospect” as you are reviewing the resumes so you can focus on the shortlist of more qualified candidates when you revisit them.

The next step in the process is to make every effort to forward only the best applicants to your manager for review, so you don’t waste the manager’s time and earn his/her confidence that you understand the critical needs.

Obtaining Interview Feedback

One of the most challenging aspects of the hiring process is about to occur… obtaining useful feedback from your staff during this review process. No matter how many employees you engage in the hiring process, it’s important that you gather the feedback in a consistent and meaningful way.

Let’s discuss how you use candidate evaluation forms filled out by your managers and staff during the review process.

Standardize Interview Feedback

Utilizing multiple choice, ratings or scale questions when requesting feedback may prevent receiving vague reasons they are not interested and emails that are difficult to interpret. While you will find feedback questionnaires helpful during the review process, you will find them even more necessary after the applicant has been interviewed.

When each member of the hiring team contributes to the interview feedback form, you elevate the entire process. Each person’s perspective and expertise improves the scoring.

The result? You will find best-fit employees quickly.

Job Interview Evaluation Comments Samples

Here are some examples of effective interview feedback evaluation forms. You can modify them as appropriate for the specific position. For example, if the position requires additional skills not listed here, add the skills to the first evaluation sample.

Interview Feedback Examples (Pre Interview)

Very often the manager reads the candidate’s resume and uses a gut feeling to determine if the candidate should be considered. They may even make a judgment based on the resume format, the number of jobs and where they went to school. If you ask the manager exactly what it is they liked or didn’t like, you will receive more meaningful information and can make a more informed decision about whether you should invite this candidate in for an actual face to face interview.

Pre interview questionnaire

Examples of Effective Manager Feedback Questions (Post Interview)

The feedback you receive from the staff involved in the face to face interview can also be based on more fair and factual information if guidelines for evaluation are distributed. It is recommended that the skills or competencies needed to be successful in the job are listed so the interviewer can explore these areas during the interview and rate each candidate effectively. Please note the two different examples below.

Negative/Positive Interview Comments Example #1

Post Interview 1-1

Post Interview 1-2

Post Interview 1-3

Negative/Positive Interview Comments Example #2

Post Interview 2-1

How Job Interview Feedback Fits in the Applicant Journey

Job interview evaluation influences other applicant touchpoints. As such, it can help you improve job descriptions, interview scripts, and other candidate communications.

It also helps members of your hiring team become better at evaluating candidates. It’s a key best practice for any company that is serious about improving hiring outcomes.

Benefits of a Structured Interview Feedback Process

  1. Avoids typical evaluations of candidates that may be filled with ambiguity, superficial statements, and generalizations.
  2. Your hiring decision is based on objective information that the candidate’s skills match your job or project requirements—not because they are an excellent resume writer.
  3. The standardized evaluation questions point out the different opinions of the interview/ evaluation staff and help raise any red flags about the candidate.
  4. Ensures your hiring process is in compliance with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).
  5. Helps avoid costly hiring mistakes.
  6. Using multiple selection methods helps to ensure you are choosing the best candidate–No single technique on its own can predict on-the-job performance and success.
  7. Streamlines the process and ensure a better, fit—increasing employee retention and productivity.
Dispelling 5 Hiring Myths That Can Hinder Your Company’s 2020 Talent Acquisition

Dispelling 5 Hiring Myths That Can Hinder Your Company’s 2020 Talent Acquisition

Hiring myths hamper your recruiting efforts.

Let’s debunk some of the common misconceptions.

1. Work-from-home policies lower productivity and reduce collaboration.

Companies in widely diverse industries have found the opposite to be true. When managed correctly, remote employees are just as effective as onsite workers. Inexpensive (or free) cloud-based software solves collaboration problems.

JetBlue allows folks to work as far as three hours from headquarters—close enough to come in now and again but a much bigger radius from which it can draw applicants. When I asked the people at JetBlue about this policy, they said it helped them gain access to educated, high-ability mothers who wanted flexibility in their jobs. The airline believes this policy has improved the quality of its workforce.

Many companies have experienced higher retention among their offsite staff. Work/life balance increases engagement as well. Don’t rule out telecommuting due to outdated hiring myths.

2. There’s no reason to actively recruit people with disabilities.

Many employers believe that people with disabilities are less productive. Absenteeism is also a concern. And they assume it will be costly to make accommodations.

Studies have disproven these assumptions. Employees with disabilities are just as productive. They aren’t absent more frequently.

‘Reasonable accommodations’ may have a moderate cost, but the Work Opportunity Tax Credit can offset the amount.

According to the DOL’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), two-thirds of employer accommodations for employee disabilities cost under $500, and most of the remainder require no special costs. (Source)

3. Hiring older employees has many drawbacks.

Last year, employees age 55 or older filled 49 percent of U.S. jobs.

But hiring myths about workers aged 50+ abound. The most common are: 1.They will demand a higher-than-average salary. 2.They aren’t tech-savvy. 3. They have significantly higher healthcare costs.

Each of these misconceptions have been disproven in many studies. Employers who hesitate to hire older candidates are missing out.

Older workers are more productive, have lower turnover, stay with an employer considerably longer than younger individuals and possess the accumulated knowledge and skills of a lifetime. Analysis of the economic value and profit contribution of age 50+ workers produces a strong argument for the retention and recruitment of older workers. (Source)

4. If you wait long enough, you’ll find an ideal candidate.

Not in this labor market. That’s why there is a renewed focus on soft skills. Many candidates don’t have the exact education and experience you could insist on if there wasn’t a talent shortage. In response, some companies have increased opportunities for on-the-job training.

Demand is outstripping supply. At the best of times, employers will find it near on impossible to find talent that perfectly fits all the position requirements. (Source)

Crafting job descriptions and requirements for soft skills is no longer optional. Structured interviewing questions are also critical.

5. An ATS is a luxury that small businesses can’t afford.

An ATS saves more money than it costs. As such, it can be the best way to stretch your recruiting budget.

Why?

It allows you to process and screen more applicants faster. This improves your quality-of-hire because you can compete with larger companies.

Another hiring myth is that ATSs remove the personal element. Because they narrow the pool of applicants quickly, they allow you to focus your attention on the most qualified.

ATS’ improve engagement for your entire staff. When your workforce has to cover for unfilled positions, you are at risk of employee burnout. Filling positions faster reduces or eliminates productivity gaps.

An ATS may also allow you to bring all hiring in-house. You won’t need outside agencies to find talent. Use software as capable as the platforms used by professional recruiters. Your hiring outcomes will improve AND you’ll save money.

Infographic detailing several benefits of an applicant tracking system

 

By Liz Strikwerda

Helpful Guidance For Successful Internal Recruiting: What, Why, How

Helpful Guidance For Successful Internal Recruiting: What, Why, How

When it comes to 2019 hiring challenges, many companies don’t take advantage of internal recruiting. This is puzzling, because most employers are intensely focused on retention. Plus many are struggling to meet staffing needs.

Internal recruiting helps on both fronts. Let’s discuss the relationship.

First, the fundamentals.

What is Internal Recruiting?

Internal recruiting is the process of identifying and attracting current employees to accept another job position within your organization.

Types of Internal Recruiting

  1. Promotions: When an employee is promoted to a higher position
  2. Location transfer: When an employee relocates to another office or sales territory
  3. Inter-departmental transfer: When an employee assumes a similar level position within their department
  4. Temporary-to-permanent: When an intern, temp, or part-timer assumes a full-time, permanent position
  5. Contractor-to-employee: When a 1099 independent contractor becomes an in-house employee
  6. Boomerang employees: Retired employees who return to work, sometimes part-time or as a contractor

Internally Assisted Recruiting

This is related to the types discussed previously. When existing employees recommend outside applicants, it can be extremely effective. One important difference is that it doesn’t leave a position vacated.

Current employees understand your company culture. They are in a position to know if a referral would also thrive in your organization. In one sense, they have performed a first-level screening.

What Are The Benefits of Internal Recruiting?

Financial Savings

When an existing employee assumes another position, you save time and money on:

Minimizes Hiring Risk

Internal recruits fit in with the company culture and have established relationships. Plus, they are already on the payroll. If you make a hiring mistake, you may be able to move them back to their original team.

Career Development Opportunities

Most employees want to advance along a career path. This is only possible with promotions—a type of internal recruiting.

Faster Hiring and Time-to-Productivity

Internal recruits don’t need to be onboarded. They require less training. Plus, they often accept a job offer more quickly than an outside applicant. Finally, it’s less common for an internal recruit to ask for an extended interim before starting the new position.

Employee Engagement and Productivity

Companies that promote from within often have a more engaged and productive team. When they see your company investing in them, it improves performance and sense of common purpose. Employees who are invested in your business serve your customers better. When it comes to retention, a commitment to your mission can be as important as benefits and perks.

Employee Retention

There is a higher retention rate for internal recruits in many industries. Presumably, they already enjoy working at your company. If they accept a promotion or transfer, they are probably planning to stay a while.

Tips For Successful Internal Recruiting

  • Create rules
    • Are all employees allowed to apply?
    • Is there a minimum tenure for eligibility?
    • Can managers invite employees from other departments to apply for positions on their team?
    • Do employees need permission from managers to apply?
    • Who needs to be involved in the decision-making process?
    • Should you use an outside hiring team to screen and evaluate candidates to mitigate potential biases?
  • Formalize internal job postings
  • Give non-selected applicants feedback to help them the next time they apply for an internal position
  • Screen internal employees just as carefully as outside applicants
  • Use applicant tracking software for internal applicants the same way you use it for outside applicants

When Not to Use Internal Recruiting

Do you need fresh ideas in a department? If there is stagnation, an internal recruit may not be the best person for the job.

Do you need to increase diversity in your organization? Internal recruiting will only reinforce the status quo.

Have you created a new department? Are you planning to develop a new product? If you don’t have the necessary skills and/or experience on your staff, you’ll need to go outside your company.

ApplicantStack For Internal Recruitment

ApplicantStack applicant tracking software simplifies external and internal recruiting. Track applicants, write screening questionnaires, share feedback, and create structured interviews. Try ApplicantStack for free today.

Structured Interview Questions: The Ultimate Interview Guide

Structured Interview Questions: The Ultimate Interview Guide

5 Minute Read

What Are Structured Interviews?

A structured interview uses a uniform script of questions. The interviewer follows the same script for each candidate. The questions are chosen specifically for the skills required for the position. They also include questions that reveal desired behavioral attributes.

Standardized Scoring

A structured interview system also uses a uniform format for rating applicants. The scoring system is tied to the interview questions. Structured interview questions and scoring provide a standardized way to evaluate applicants. If you want to improve your hiring outcomes, consider creating a structured interview process.

How Does A Structured Interview Process Improve Hiring?

  • It is more objective—all applicants are asked the same questions in the same order
  • It minimizes confirmation bias (when the interviewer seeks to confirm a subjective first impression or initial bias)
  • It is more effective for evaluating soft skills
  • It helps the interviewer cover all the important topics
  • It helps the employer comply with laws governing hiring practices
  • It is more efficient

How Do You Create a Structured Interview?

  • Write a highly-detailed job description
    • Include skills/certifications/experience (hard skills)
    • Identify the behavioral qualities (soft skills) you are looking for
    • Use the STAR method to create behavioral questions
  • Create a script that puts the questions in order
  • Create a scale to rate the answers to each question
  • Keep interview variables as uniform as possible—time of day, location, interviewer
  • Train hiring managers on the system
    • Make sure interviewers are familiar with the script before they interview a candidate
  • Interview applicants
  • Rate each applicant on each question/answer
  • Schedule feedback meetings with the hiring team
    • Evaluate applicants using ratings

What Are Behavioral Questions?

Behavioral questions are more effective for predicting how an applicant will perform in the job role. Behavioral questions focus on how the candidate performed in previous positions. Behavioral questions also identify soft skills.

What Are Soft Skills?

Soft skills are behavioral attributes that help an employee be effective at their job. They are especially helpful for positions that require working with a team. They are also important for management roles.

What Soft Skills Do Employers Look For?

The following soft skills help employees be successful in their jobs:

  • Positive attitude
  • Communication (written and verbal)
  • Adaptability
  • Leadership
  • Organization
  • Time management
  • Critical thinking
  • Collaborating with a team
  • Coachability
  • Ability to learn from criticism
  • Ability to resolve conflict
  • Creative problem-solving
  • Dependability
  • Self-confidence
  • Honesty and integrity

What is The STAR Method For Behavioral Questions?

The STAR method is a common system for creating behavioral questions. STAR stands for situation, task, action, result. The STAR method works best when you are specific as possible.

To write an interview question using the STAR method:

  • Identify a challenging situation common to the position
  • Identify the task you wish to achieve (your goal)
  • Identify what action should be taken to accomplish the task
  • Identify the ideal result

Examples of Behavioral Questions And The Soft Skills They Reveal

  1. Why do you feel you are the best person for this position? (Strengths, self confidence, ambition)
  2. Tell me about a time you made a mistake. What did you do about it? (Weaknesses, maintaining composure under pressure, ability to receive criticism, self-awareness)
  3. Describe a problem at your previous job and how you solved it. (Problem solving ability)
  4. Describe a situation in a previous position where you had to resolve a conflict between members of your team? What did you do? How did it turn out? (Conflict resolution, creative thinking, ability to work as a team, leadership, positive attitude)
  5. What’s  your favorite thing about [insert applicable job position]? (Values, goals)
  6. How would you prioritize competing projects that have the same deadline? (Organization, creative problem solving)
  7. Describe a time you disagreed with your manager and what you did about it. (Coachability)
  8. Describe a time you had to persuade team members to do something they didn’t want to do. (Leadership, management)
  9. Describe a time you had to learn something fast for your job. (Adaptability, creative problem solving, critical thinking)
  10. Did you ever fail to meet a deadline? Why? What did you do about it? (Work ethic, organization, time management)
  11. Have you ever had an ethical dilemma at work? What did you do? (Integrity, honesty)

Tailor these questions to the position. For example, for a customer service position, ask the applicant to describe a time they solved a problem for a customer. For a teaching position, use scenarios involving students. 

Behavioral questions can reveal whether a candidate is a better fit for another position. Keep the applicant in your candidate pool for future openings within your company.

How Do I Create a Structured Interview Process?

A structured interview process requires organization and documentation. An applicant tracking system (ATS) with interview tools streamlines the process. You create job postings, job descriptions, questionnaires, interview scripts, and ratings scorecards.

Cloud-based systems help your hiring team collaborate. They provide centralized access and electronic records. Everyone can see the feedback and scoring for each applicant. Search tools help you track multiple applicants and job positions.

ATS’ maintain a candidate pool. You can reach out to previously rejected (but qualified) applicants for future openings. This gives you a head start for each job opening.

An ATS simplifies interview scheduling. You can email applicants from the software. You create email templates for the standard ‘Thank you for your application’ emails. Write personalized emails when you can. Let the system send auto-emails when you don’t have time.

Applicant Tracking Systems With Interview Tools Make it Easy

ATS’ are affordable for small businesses and tight hiring budgets. Most have a nominal sign-up fee. You can start small and inexpensive and scale up as your company grows. If you are wary of long-term contracts, look for a month-to-month subscription. For a small investment, you can try it out. Discover how it streamlines structured interviewing.

Systems with onboarding tools allow you to change an applicant’s status to ‘Hired’ and migrate them to the onboarding process. You won’t have to enter all of their information again.

SwipeClock ApplicantStack for Structured Interviews

ApplicantStack Recruit helps small businesses implement the same type of structured interviews used by large employers. ApplicantStack solutions help you thrive in today’s competitive labor market. You can try ApplicantStack Recruit for free and start improving your hiring outcomes.


Our article, Structured Interview Questions: The Ultimate Interview Guide was featured on the CloserIQ weekly roundup as one of their top articles to read on the hiring process during the week of May 15:

CloserIQ weekly roundup