What Is a Job Posting?

What Is a Job Posting?

Are you creating effective job postings? If you find yourself looking through dozens of unqualified candidates, the problem might be with the way you’re advertising your openings. To understand how to write a listing that will attract the candidates you want, we have to get back to the basics. Just what is a job posting? And what kind of information do you need to include?

What a Job Posting Should NOT Be

A job posting should not be a copied and pasted job description. Most job descriptions are hundreds of words long. Your potential candidates are going to be scrolling through to find the relevant information. If a requirement is buried deep in your job listing, they might not see it. On the other hand, you can’t just snatch a few brief, vague lines from the job summary and expect to get high-quality candidates. Your professional time is limited, but if you don’t “pay now” by writing a great job posting, you’ll pay later when you have to read and respond to those unqualified applicants.

Components of a Job Posting

What is a job posting? Every good job posting contains certain elements. Here’s what you have to include.

Job Title

This may be one of the trickier parts of creating your job posting. It’s the first thing the job seeker sees, and often what entices him or her to click on your ad. You need to accurately describe the job, using words that someone might type into the job board search engine. Don’t title your job ad, “Chief Happiness Officer,” “Fashion Evangelist,” or one of these other ridiculous job titles. If you’re looking for a marketing manager, the words “marketing manager” should appear at least somewhere in your job title. Your job title should also indicate what level you are looking for — senior, associate, entry level, lead, etc.

But you want to stand out from the thousands of other “marketing manager” postings out there. After all, what is a job posting but an advertisement? Add something special to your job title. What makes this job stand out from its competitors? Think about your USP – unique selling point – and include that in your job title. Here are some examples:

  • Entry Level Marketing Manager for a Fortune 100 Company
  • Top-Paid Senior Marketing Manager for Century-Old Company
  • Entry Level Marketing Manager Position with Advancement Opportunities
  • Start-Up Needs a Lead Marketing Manager Ready to Take the Reins
  • Want to Work in the Heart of Boston? We Need a Head Marketing Manager!

Each of these job titles incorporates at least one important selling feature, whether it’s prestige, salary, security, career path, autonomy, or location.

Job Responsibilities

This is not intended to be an exhaustive list of duties your prospective employee is expected to perform. That’s what the job description is for. Instead, choose three to five of the most important and most challenging types of tasks your employee will undertake. Make broad strokes rather than emphasizing specific duties. For example, a receptionist is expected to “act as a professional, friendly representative who serves as the first contact point for our customers, greeting everyone in a friendly manner and ensuring each client is taken care of.” That’s more descriptive (and a much more interesting job!) than “answer the phone and make appointments.”

Remember, you’re selling yourself here. Skip the boring responsibilities and focus on what makes this job special. Think about a real estate advertisement. It doesn’t mention things like “toilet included” or “every room has a floor” or “the front door has a window.” It focuses on the things that will really impress! Everyone knows a receptionist is going to answer the phone and make appointments. When you have limited space and your candidates have a limited attention span, you’ve got to really wow them.

Qualifications

If you have requirements, state them explicitly and without any doubt. Say something like, “In order to be considered for this position, you must meet the following minimum qualifications.” That will be more likely to discourage an unqualified candidate than language like “the ideal candidate will have experience with…” In the latter case, an applicant might think, “Well, I’m not the ideal candidate, but I’m still a good one!”

Clearly delineate your needs versus your desires. Separate the must haves from the nice-to-haves. You need to be very obvious about what will and won’t work for you. Otherwise, you’re going to waste the candidate’s time as well as your own.

Details

Add any extra details that make your job stand apart from others. Today’s marketplace is global; don’t neglect to mention your location! Be specific here. Everyone wants a shorter commute! Here are some additional points you may want to mention:

  • PTO policy
  • Work-from-home policy
  • Corporate culture
  • Educational opportunities
  • Interesting projects your company has been involved with
  • Other benefits and perks

Make Your Elevator Pitch

So what is a job posting, in short? It’s your elevator pitch. It’s a quick, to-the-point summary of the best things about your company and this position. It describes why your company is a great place to work and who will be successful in the job. You don’t have to include every last detail. Focus on primary responsibilities and the must-have credentials and experience. Use bullet points to avoid long, intimidating blocks of text. Make sure your job posting is concise, interesting, and informative.

Before you post your job, ask someone else to take a look at it. A fresh pair of eyes can help you identify weaknesses you may not have noticed. What would you think if you were looking at this position? Would it inspire you to apply, or would you simply pass it by?

ApplicantStack and Google for Jobs

ApplicantStack and Google for Jobs

Google logoApplicantStack has integrated with Google for Jobs to make finding the right candidate even easier.

ApplicantStack and Google for Jobs: You can now automatically push your jobs to appear in Google for JobsGoogle for Jobs is a new job search engine powered by Google and is a job search tool which boosts the exposure of your job listings to help you attract more relevant candidates to your roles.  Job seekers can search for and apply to open positions directly from Google search. Google’s advanced technology makes it easier to find jobs that are a good match for what you’re looking for in your next position.  It is similar to how Indeed pulls job listings from many different sources.

How to post to Google for Jobs in ApplicantStack

When using ApplicantStack, simply go to your jobs launch page and select “Google for Jobs” here:

ApplicantStack - Google for Jobs launch

 

Simply continue as you would with any other job board included in your ApplciantStack account.

 

 

 

How can candidates find your jobs on Google for Jobs

When a candidate searches for a job in Google, they can easily select apply with “ApplicantStack”ApplicantStack and Google for Jobs

and they will be directed to your ApplicantStack job board where you can track the candidate in your workflow, communicate with them right from your ApplicantStack portal, & hire the right candidate!

 

Please note that Google does have full discretion of what they place in their feed. By submitting your job through ApplicantStack, there is no guarantee that your job will post on Google for Jobs.

 

Try ApplicantStack for Free for 15 days!

How to Save Time with Pre-screening Questions!

How to Save Time with Pre-screening Questions!

Pre-screening Questions

Pre-screening QuestionsGoing through hundreds (sometimes even thousands) of resumes can be very time-consuming.  Being a human resource professional, there are many items on your to-do list and freeing up some time is always a plus.  That is where Pre-screening Questions can come in handy.

Here are a few ways to save time using pre-screening questions:

Location-based Pre-screening Questions:

Once you have a clear understanding of the job requirements you can easily set up pre-screening questions to bypass those candidates that don’t meet the job criteria.  For example, if your job is for a specific location, you might want to make that a pre-screening question.

“Are you able to work in the New York City office?”

or you can be extremely specific about the location

“Are you able to work 9:00 am – 5 pm EST in the office located on 23rd Street and Madison Ave. in NYC?”

Answers to both questions can be set to “Yes” or “No” where “No” would be a knock out question.

Salary-based Pre-screening Questions:

Another pre-screening question that can save you a lot of time is to set up a yes or no question for a salary-related question.  (Please be aware of your state and local laws regarding salary questions – some states are no longer allowing salary-related questions).  If you are looking to hire someone for a job and know the salary cannot exceed $85,000, getting a clear understanding of salary expectations might be beneficial.  Consider creating a pre-screening question such as:

“The salary for this position is $75,000-$85,000.  Is this salary range acceptable to you?”

Where the answer provided is either “Yes” or “No” where “No” would be a knockout question:

Experience-based Pre-screening Questions:

Experience-based questions are another fitting example of pre-screening questions.

If you are looking for candidates with a minimum of 3 years’ experience as a C# developer, you could set up experienced-based questions with a range:

“How many years of C# development experience do you have?”

With the following ranges:

< 1-year

1 – 2 years

> 2-years

You can either set up a value for the ranges and/or set <1-year experience as a knockout question.

Having multiple pre-screening questions can save valuable time for a human resource professional in finding the top candidates and ultimately the right new employee. 

Try ApplicantStack for yourself and see just how easy setting up pre-screening questions are!

Click below to start your Free 15-day ApplicantStack trial:

Request a free no obligation trial!

 

 

ApplicantStack: Best of 2017

ApplicantStack: Best of 2017

 

 

ApplicantStack: Best of 2017

ApplicantStack - Best of 2017

As we prepare to recycle the 2017 kitten and puppy calendars for their updated versions, we want to take a minute to look back at what a wonderful year 2017 has been.  We bring you the “ApplicantStack: Best of 2017”  The ApplicantStack team has worked hard to bring our customers new features to make recruiting and onboarding even better!

Although we are gearing up for an exciting 2018, here are some features that we rolled out in 2017:

 

May 2018 bring you many new opportunities, and may your goals for the New Year ahead stay firm, turning all your goals into reality and all your efforts into great achievements.

Request your 15-day no obligation trial here!