New Employee Onboarding Checklist for 2019

New Employee Onboarding Checklist for 2019

Onboarding a new employee can be quite challenging and time-consuming.  Every phase of the employee onboarding process is important, so make sure to have a new hire checklist to onboard your new employee.  You can use the following outline as a guide, however, every organization will have its own unique requirements.  These tasks will need to be adjusted for the type of employment (full time, part time, seasonal), but having an initial, general list will provide a good starting point for different positions.  We have outlined a new employee onboarding checklist to make it less daunting.

Step 1:

Create a list of tasks that new employees will need to complete and that current team members will need to work on/setup prior to the new employees first day.  Example tasks to put on new hire checklist could include, but are not limited to:

Prepare any State & Federal tax forms that need to be completed.  Some of these forms might require input from multiple individuals.  Having a system in place where these can be created and completed online can save time and resources.  The ability to upload these forms form a library can be beneficial to any busy HR professional.

Prepare any job-related forms that will need to be completed and/or signed by the employee or current team member.  Having a system in place to easily upload and create fillable forms can make this task much easier.

Gather any health insurance forms and benefits information

Identify any computer or other peripheral needs that need to be set up prior to the employee arriving on the first-day

Order any technology equipment

Order phone and create new extension

Obtain a new photo ID

Order business cards

Order any materials/supplies needed by the new employee

Make any arrangements for parking/transportation

Add new employee to relevant email lists

Identify any socialization tasks such as a tour of facilities or welcome lunch/meeting

Step 2:

Put together any supporting documents and links to any videos.  These should be items that do not require any input or signatures.  Example supporting documents might be included on a new hire checklist include, but are not limited to:

Welcome message for new employees

Contact namesNew Hire checklist - library

Phone/extension list

Any training material or videos that will need to be watched

Benefit packages to review

 

Step 3:

Assign tasks from the new employee onboarding checklist to current team members and new hires.  An automated process for task reminders is an invaluable tool.  Having the ability to set deadlines with reminders will ensure that the tasks will get done.  It is also helpful to be able to visually see the progress indicators that show any outstanding tasks.

Assign all tasks to any relevant person with a due datenew hire checklist - checklist

Order assignments according to time needed to complete tasks and dependencies between tasks

Create email remainders

Monitor completion of tasks on the new hire checklist

Step 4:

Establish clear communication with the new hire.  Having an employee portal to facilitate the new hire checklist can make this much easier.  An employee portal can be viewed as their own virtual assistant that can help the onboarding process run smoothly.  Here are some items to include when using a portal:

Their manager’s contact information

List of tasks from the new hire checklist

Any materials that they need to review and/or sign (from Steps 1 & 2) A progress indicator and list of deadlines to help the new hire complete all the tasks

Step 5:

Review your plan and make the necessary tweaks for the next employee.  Don’t assume that one new hire checklist is going to fit all employees!  Luckily fully-automated tools such as ApplicantStack Onboard allow for on the fly updates and customizations.

Ready to implement your new employee onboarding checklist? Download a copy of our checklist here:

New Employee Onboarding Checklist

 

What Is a Job Posting?

What Is a Job Posting?

Are you creating effective job postings? If you find yourself looking through dozens of unqualified candidates, the problem might be with the way you’re advertising your openings. To understand how to write a listing that will attract the candidates you want, we have to get back to the basics. Just what is a job posting? And what kind of information do you need to include?

What a Job Posting Should NOT Be

A job posting should not be a copied and pasted job description. Most job descriptions are hundreds of words long. Your potential candidates are going to be scrolling through to find the relevant information. If a requirement is buried deep in your job listing, they might not see it. On the other hand, you can’t just snatch a few brief, vague lines from the job summary and expect to get high-quality candidates. Your professional time is limited, but if you don’t “pay now” by writing a great job posting, you’ll pay later when you have to read and respond to those unqualified applicants.

Components of a Job Posting

What is a job posting? Every good job posting contains certain elements. Here’s what you have to include.

Job Title

This may be one of the trickier parts of creating your job posting. It’s the first thing the job seeker sees, and often what entices him or her to click on your ad. You need to accurately describe the job, using words that someone might type into the job board search engine. Don’t title your job ad, “Chief Happiness Officer,” “Fashion Evangelist,” or one of these other ridiculous job titles. If you’re looking for a marketing manager, the words “marketing manager” should appear at least somewhere in your job title. Your job title should also indicate what level you are looking for — senior, associate, entry level, lead, etc.

But you want to stand out from the thousands of other “marketing manager” postings out there. After all, what is a job posting but an advertisement? Add something special to your job title. What makes this job stand out from its competitors? Think about your USP – unique selling point – and include that in your job title. Here are some examples:

  • Entry Level Marketing Manager for a Fortune 100 Company
  • Top-Paid Senior Marketing Manager for Century-Old Company
  • Entry Level Marketing Manager Position with Advancement Opportunities
  • Start-Up Needs a Lead Marketing Manager Ready to Take the Reins
  • Want to Work in the Heart of Boston? We Need a Head Marketing Manager!

Each of these job titles incorporates at least one important selling feature, whether it’s prestige, salary, security, career path, autonomy, or location.

Job Responsibilities

This is not intended to be an exhaustive list of duties your prospective employee is expected to perform. That’s what the job description is for. Instead, choose three to five of the most important and most challenging types of tasks your employee will undertake. Make broad strokes rather than emphasizing specific duties. For example, a receptionist is expected to “act as a professional, friendly representative who serves as the first contact point for our customers, greeting everyone in a friendly manner and ensuring each client is taken care of.” That’s more descriptive (and a much more interesting job!) than “answer the phone and make appointments.”

Remember, you’re selling yourself here. Skip the boring responsibilities and focus on what makes this job special. Think about a real estate advertisement. It doesn’t mention things like “toilet included” or “every room has a floor” or “the front door has a window.” It focuses on the things that will really impress! Everyone knows a receptionist is going to answer the phone and make appointments. When you have limited space and your candidates have a limited attention span, you’ve got to really wow them.

Qualifications

If you have requirements, state them explicitly and without any doubt. Say something like, “In order to be considered for this position, you must meet the following minimum qualifications.” That will be more likely to discourage an unqualified candidate than language like “the ideal candidate will have experience with…” In the latter case, an applicant might think, “Well, I’m not the ideal candidate, but I’m still a good one!”

Clearly delineate your needs versus your desires. Separate the must haves from the nice-to-haves. You need to be very obvious about what will and won’t work for you. Otherwise, you’re going to waste the candidate’s time as well as your own.

Details

Add any extra details that make your job stand apart from others. Today’s marketplace is global; don’t neglect to mention your location! Be specific here. Everyone wants a shorter commute! Here are some additional points you may want to mention:

  • PTO policy
  • Work-from-home policy
  • Corporate culture
  • Educational opportunities
  • Interesting projects your company has been involved with
  • Other benefits and perks

Make Your Elevator Pitch

So what is a job posting, in short? It’s your elevator pitch. It’s a quick, to-the-point summary of the best things about your company and this position. It describes why your company is a great place to work and who will be successful in the job. You don’t have to include every last detail. Focus on primary responsibilities and the must-have credentials and experience. Use bullet points to avoid long, intimidating blocks of text. Make sure your job posting is concise, interesting, and informative.

Before you post your job, ask someone else to take a look at it. A fresh pair of eyes can help you identify weaknesses you may not have noticed. What would you think if you were looking at this position? Would it inspire you to apply, or would you simply pass it by?

My Personal Journey to ApplicantStack

My Personal Journey to ApplicantStack

How did I get here and what was my journey to ApplicantStack?

6 min read

Journey to ApplicantStack

When I began my job at my last position at a help desk company, one item I was tasked with was researching a better way to recruit new employees.

I was surprised that a technology company’s recruitment process comprised manually posting jobs on sites such as CareerBuilder, Indeed, local job boards, and some colleges.

The instructions to apply consisted of an email address that “organized” the resumes into Outlook folders based on the job they were applying to. Then we spent time weeding through, in some cases, hundreds of resumes to find candidates that were worth pursuing.

The candidates that weren’t a fit were never sent a “Thank you for applying email” because frankly, that was just too much work. This resulted in more emails, calls, and the occasional pop-in-the-office to find out their status.

“Worthwhile” resumes would then need to be printed and another sheet would be stapled to the resume that included fields to be filled out. “Date Resume Received”, Date Email Sent, Phone Screen Date & Time, etc..

The candidate would then be contacted along with a list of dates & times for a phone screen.

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And that’s when the real chaos began…

Human Resources Valuable Time

Endless emails back and forth trying to set up dates and times. Once a time slot was taken, I would need to turn down appointments letting them know that the week’s slots were taken with a new list for the following week.

The phone screens consisted of a series of questions and answers that would need to be manually typed.

Most of the time I needed to disclaim that I can’t type as fast as they would talk so there would be some silence during the call as I caught up.

If the candidate did not pass the phone screen, they were emailed letting them know we appreciated their time, but we were pursuing another candidate.

The candidates that passed the phone screen round were emailed with technical test session id’s and/or personality assessments. If they passed, they were sent another email with yet again a list of dates and times for their first in-person team interview.

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The coordination required for gathering available times across multiple candidates was painful, to say the least.  

Prior to the candidate’s in-person interview, their resume, the phone screen interview sheet, the results of their technical and personality assessments, and a sheet of paper with all the interview dates and times were all bundled into a paper file and labeled with the candidate’s name.

The candidate would arrive in the office and be brought to an available conference room where they needed to complete a hand-written application for employment, which would be added to the folder.

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Don’t Let Qualified Candidates Slip Through the Cracks

Fast forward the second round of in-person interviews, the offer was finally presented to the candidate. Sometimes the amount of time that passed from when the candidate applied to when an offer was extended could be upwards of two months.

By that time most candidates lost interest or took another job at another company.

Who could blame them! 

Yes, we tried to be more organized and create excel spreadsheets to track some of this information. We also ran reports letting our CEO know how many candidates were received and all the stages of the interview process they completed.

But this was extremely time consuming and redundant.

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Hence my question: “why use an applicant tracking system?”

It was clear that the answer was I needed help and so began my quest for an applicant tracking system (ATS).

I evaluated several products based on pricing and ease of use.

One product offered a potentially cost-effective onetime setup fee, but we would need to map out our entire process up front.

If that process ever changed, we would need to re-setup the entire product and pay the setup fee again!

Since we were a relatively small company with high turnover and a need to constantly evolve our recruiting process, that option just wasn’t going to work for us in the long run.

After hearing about ApplicantStack from several other companies, I decided to take a chance and test it out.

After all, they were offering a free trial, and if I didn’t feel it met my organization’s needs, I could take my data back and continue with my ATS evaluation.

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I decided to test it out with our most hard to fill, immediate need job on a Friday.

It was very easy to create a new job and ApplicantStack offered multiple resources to me for assistance if needed.

I was also able to create custom workflows to match our current process. I posted the job on Friday and it was instantly available on my public job board and within several hours the job was posted to CareerBuilder, Indeed, LinkedIn, and other job boards.

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By Monday morning, I received over 50 new applicants who all received an automatic email letting them know that if they were a match for the position they would be contacted.

This immediately cut down on those emails and calls about whether we received their resume.

Going through the resumes was also quicker, but at that time I didn’t have any screener questions set up.

Once I added basic screener questions with scoring the initial review process became much more efficient.

I could easily knock out candidates who didn’t meet the basic criteria for the job.

At that time the candidate scheduling feature now offered by ApplicantStack wasn’t available, and I can only imagine how much more time it would have saved by allowing the candidates to select available phone interview times on my calendar!

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Data Driven Recruiting

What was also extremely helpful was that I no longer needed to create reports in Excel.

I was able to use the pre-built standard reports found in ApplicantStack to show me information such as sources of applicants so I could easily see where my candidates were coming from.

This helped me focus my recruiting budget on the best sources.

The analytics for my CEO was also a time saver since it provided all the information he was looking for.

We were also able to determine our bottlenecks in the recruiting process and adjustments needed at no additional cost.

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By this point, it was clear that ApplicantStack was the right choice for our company and we decided to start by paying for it month-to-month.

Eventually, we were so pleased with the results and ease of use that we switched to an annual plan.

 

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You might be asking yourself, “So Jennifer, how did you wind up working for ApplicantStack?”

My passion for helping companies find the best solutions to make their jobs easier and more efficient set me on a path that eventually brought me to ApplicantStack where my background in recruiting, human resources, and technology have allowed me to provide direct input into making ApplicantStack the award-winning product it is today.

We listen to our customers’ feedback and continue to evolve in the ever-changing human resources world.

The way I see it, every day we are improving the lives of thousands of recruiters and human resource professionals by helping them to be more efficient and to hire the best candidates.

 

 

Online Recruitment Tools

Online Recruitment Tools

Online Recruitment Tools for the Modern Recruiter

2 min read

Online Recruitment Tools

Key Features of Online Recruitment Tools to Make Recruiting Easier:  With low unemployment and strong competition for qualified candidates, there has never been a better time for online recruitment tools.  Implementing online recruitment tools to not only work more efficiently but also to save valuable time in the recruiting and employee onboarding process is now easy thanks to full-featured applicant tracking systems such as ApplicantStack.

Here are just a few key features of online recruitment tools:

Automate screening by using pre-screener questions

  • Setting up pre-screener questions is a fantastic way to save time
  • Add scoring and knockout questions and focus on only the top-rated candidates
  • See Save Time with Pre-Screening Questions for more detailed information on pre-screener questions

Rediscover candidates you already have in your database that might be a fit

  • Use search and reporting tools to find candidates that match certain skill sets
  • Use advanced Boolean search options to only focus on candidates that match the current job requirements
  • View a candidate’s profile where key data is stored such as resume, cover letter, and applications along with any past feedback

Provide automated communication and scheduling flexibility

  • Set up automatic email responses to candidates letting them know you received their resume and application
  • Easily use our scheduling feature that integrates with most calendars
  • Allow candidates to also choose available times on your calendar eliminating calls or emails
  • Enable all team members to arrange candidate interviews without your assistance

Collecting and managing Manager feedback

  • Centralized data in one spot makes collaboration simple
  • Use the standard feedback forms or create your own
  • Score/rate candidates so you can focus on the top-rated candidates in one convenient place for your team to review and make quicker job offers before your competitors do
  • Build your own phone screen templates and reference check forms to store feedback and notes

Reporting on all the progress

  • Use our standard reports to see which sources are providing the top candidates
  • See how long it takes to fill a position and see if there are any bottlenecks that require attention
  • Run EEOC reports to stay compliant
  • See job workflow and candidate summaries, and so much more

Take advantage of the online recruiting tools for the modern recruiter to save time and hire the right candidates faster!

 

Online recruitment tools are also known as cloud recruitment software and recruitment tracker.

To learn more about ApplicantStack, Click here to request a Free Trial!

Human Resources Valuable Time

Human Resources Valuable Time

Human Resources Valuable Time

Addressing Human Resources Valuable Time:

Recently, I had an email exchange with a Human Resources Manager who indicated she was too busy to evaluate an applicant tracking system (ATS).  As a former technical recruiter and someone whose colleagues are former HR professionals, I get it.  The hundreds of resumes sitting on your desk and in your inbox, the mounds of paperwork, the countless email exchanges back and forth trying to schedule interviews with the candidate and team members, the feedback forms that require attention, the progress reporting to management, the thousands of other tasks that fill an already busy day…no wonder there isn’t any time.  Most human resource professionals do not have a second of their valuable time to find the tools that can assist them.  The amount of time it will take to research all the different options available, implement and learn a new system, and justify the expense are all items that I am sure my recent contact has been grappling with.

If knowing that taking out 30 minutes (a guesstimate at the amount of time it takes to initiate a free trial and post your first job ApplicantStack Getting Started Video [4:49] could potentially save hundreds of hours in the long run, why wouldn’t you do it?

Here are just a few of the problems that could be solved with an ATS

Problem 1:  The hundreds of resumes sitting on your desk and in your inbox

  • Save time by having all your resumes and applications organized and centrally located and easy to search via multiple criteria
  • Use screener questions and scoring to focus on the top candidates
  • Set up automatic email responses to candidates letting them know you received their resume and application
  • Easily move the candidate through your recruiting process – workflows can be set up to mimic your current process

Problem 2:  The mounds of paperwork

  • Store all new hire and employee onboarding paperwork electronically
  • Never worry about having out-of-date forms in different systems…it’s all stored and managed centrally
  • Easily see what forms applicants have completed
  • Create checklists to streamline the entire process
  • Enable new hires to sign all state and federal forms, elect health insurance, view employee handbooks, watch training videos, and more before their first day of work

Problem 3:  The countless email or phone exchanges trying to schedule interviews with the candidate and team members

  • Easily use our scheduling feature that integrates with most calendars
  • Allow candidates to also choose available times on your calendar eliminating calls or emails
  • Enable all team members to arrange candidate interviews without your assistance

Problem 4:  Collecting and managing Manager feedback

  • Again, centralized in one spot
  • Use the standard feedback forms or create your own
  • Score/rate candidates so you can focus on the top-rated candidates in one convenient place for your team to review and make quicker job offers before your competitors do
  • Build your own phone screen templates and reference check forms to store feedback and notes

Problem 5:  The reporting on all the progress

  • Use our standard reports to see which sources are providing the top candidates
  • See how long it takes to fill a position and see if there are any bottlenecks that require attention
  • Run EEOC reports to stay compliant
  • See job workflow and candidate summaries, and so much more

Problem 6:  The thousands of other tasks that fill an already busy day:

  • You might have some time in your day to get to these now

 

Find out more about ApplicantStack by starting a free trial here.