ApplicantStack and Google for Jobs

ApplicantStack and Google for Jobs

Google logoApplicantStack has integrated with Google for Jobs to make finding the right candidate even easier.

ApplicantStack and Google for Jobs: You can now automatically push your jobs to appear in Google for JobsGoogle for Jobs is a new job search engine powered by Google and is a job search tool which boosts the exposure of your job listings to help you attract more relevant candidates to your roles.  Job seekers can search for and apply to open positions directly from Google search. Google’s advanced technology makes it easier to find jobs that are a good match for what you’re looking for in your next position.  It is similar to how Indeed pulls job listings from many different sources.

How to post to Google for Jobs in ApplicantStack

When using ApplicantStack, simply go to your jobs launch page and select “Google for Jobs” here:

ApplicantStack - Google for Jobs launch

 

Simply continue as you would with any other job board included in your ApplciantStack account.

 

 

 

How can candidates find your jobs on Google for Jobs

When a candidate searches for a job in Google, they can easily select apply with “ApplicantStack”ApplicantStack and Google for Jobs

and they will be directed to your ApplicantStack job board where you can track the candidate in your workflow, communicate with them right from your ApplicantStack portal, & hire the right candidate!

 

Please note that Google does have full discretion of what they place in their feed. By submitting your job through ApplicantStack, there is no guarantee that your job will post on Google for Jobs.

 

Try ApplicantStack for Free for 15 days!

How to Save Time with Pre-screening Questions!

How to Save Time with Pre-screening Questions!

Pre-screening Questions

Pre-screening QuestionsGoing through hundreds (sometimes even thousands) of resumes can be very time-consuming.  Being a human resource professional, there are many items on your to-do list and freeing up some time is always a plus.  That is where Pre-screening Questions can come in handy.

Here are a few ways to save time using pre-screening questions:

Location-based Pre-screening Questions:

Once you have a clear understanding of the job requirements you can easily set up pre-screening questions to bypass those candidates that don’t meet the job criteria.  For example, if your job is for a specific location, you might want to make that a pre-screening question.

“Are you able to work in the New York City office?”

or you can be extremely specific about the location

“Are you able to work 9:00 am – 5 pm EST in the office located on 23rd Street and Madison Ave. in NYC?”

Answers to both questions can be set to “Yes” or “No” where “No” would be a knock out question.

Salary-based Pre-screening Questions:

Another pre-screening question that can save you a lot of time is to set up a yes or no question for a salary-related question.  (Please be aware of your state and local laws regarding salary questions – some states are no longer allowing salary-related questions).  If you are looking to hire someone for a job and know the salary cannot exceed $85,000, getting a clear understanding of salary expectations might be beneficial.  Consider creating a pre-screening question such as:

“The salary for this position is $75,000-$85,000.  Is this salary range acceptable to you?”

Where the answer provided is either “Yes” or “No” where “No” would be a knockout question:

Experience-based Pre-screening Questions:

Experience-based questions are another fitting example of pre-screening questions.

If you are looking for candidates with a minimum of 3 years’ experience as a C# developer, you could set up experienced-based questions with a range:

“How many years of C# development experience do you have?”

With the following ranges:

< 1-year

1 – 2 years

> 2-years

You can either set up a value for the ranges and/or set <1-year experience as a knockout question.

Having multiple pre-screening questions can save valuable time for a human resource professional in finding the top candidates and ultimately the right new employee. 

Try ApplicantStack for yourself and see just how easy setting up pre-screening questions are!

Click below to start your Free 15-day ApplicantStack trial:

Request a free no obligation trial!

 

 

Best Software Companies 2018 | G2 Crowd

Best Software Companies 2018 | G2 Crowd

At ApplicantStack, our best indication of success is the happiness of our customers. Today, we are excited to announce that we have been recognized by G2 Crowd on their Best Software Companies 2018 list. The list recognizes the top 100 software companies based on real customer reviews in 2017, and we are so excited to be featured!

We are also pleased to announce that we have been named one of the Top 50 Small Business in 2018.

Best Software CompaniesBest Software Companies - Top 50

G2 Crowd is the world’s leading business software and services review platform, leveraging it’s 300,000+ user reviews to help its more than one million buyers each month make smarter purchasing decisions. To qualify for inclusion on the list, a company must receive 100 or more reviews in 2017.

This is a significant recognition because this rating came entirely from our customers. This recognition by our customers is incredible, and something we’re extremely proud of and thankful for.

To the customers that have reviewed us on G2 Crowd, thank you! We appreciate your feedback and will continue striving to exceed your expectations.

See for yourself and start a FREE 15-day trial!

New Employee Onboarding Checklist [Updated 2019]

New Employee Onboarding Checklist [Updated 2019]

Onboarding a new employee can be quite challenging and time-consuming.  Every phase of the employee onboarding process is important, so make sure to have a new hire checklist to onboard your new employee.  You can use the following outline as a guide, however, every organization will have its own unique requirements.  These tasks will need to be adjusted for the type of employment (full time, part time, seasonal), but having an initial, general list will provide a good starting point for different positions.  We have outlined a new employee onboarding checklist to make it less daunting.

Step 1:

Create a list of tasks that new employees will need to complete and that current team members will need to work on/setup prior to the new employees first day.  Example tasks to put on new hire checklist could include, but are not limited to:

Prepare any State & Federal tax forms that need to be completed.  Some of these forms might require input from multiple individuals.  Having a system in place where these can be created and completed online can save time and resources.  The ability to upload these forms form a library can be beneficial to any busy HR professional.

Prepare any job-related forms that will need to be completed and/or signed by the employee or current team member.  Having a system in place to easily upload and create fillable forms can make this task much easier.

Gather any health insurance forms and benefits information

Identify any computer or other peripheral needs that need to be set up prior to the employee arriving on the first-day

Order any technology equipment

Order phone and create new extension

Obtain a new photo ID

Order business cards

Order any materials/supplies needed by the new employee

Make any arrangements for parking/transportation

Add new employee to relevant email lists

Identify any socialization tasks such as a tour of facilities or welcome lunch/meeting

Step 2:

Put together any supporting documents and links to any videos.  These should be items that do not require any input or signatures.  Example supporting documents might be included on a new hire checklist include, but are not limited to:

Welcome message for new employees

Contact namesNew Hire checklist - library

Phone/extension list

Any training material or videos that will need to be watched

Benefit packages to review

 

Step 3:

Assign tasks from the new employee onboarding checklist to current team members and new hires.  An automated process for task reminders is an invaluable tool.  Having the ability to set deadlines with reminders will ensure that the tasks will get done.  It is also helpful to be able to visually see the progress indicators that show any outstanding tasks.

Assign all tasks to any relevant person with a due datenew hire checklist - checklist

Order assignments according to time needed to complete tasks and dependencies between tasks

Create email remainders

Monitor completion of tasks on the new hire checklist

Step 4:

Establish clear communication with the new hire.  Having an employee portal to facilitate the new hire checklist can make this much easier.  An employee portal can be viewed as their own virtual assistant that can help the onboarding process run smoothly.  Here are some items to include when using a portal:

Their manager’s contact information

List of tasks from the new hire checklist

Any materials that they need to review and/or sign (from Steps 1 & 2) A progress indicator and list of deadlines to help the new hire complete all the tasks

Step 5:

Review your plan and make necessary tweaks for the next employee.  Don’t assume that one new hire checklist is going to fit all employees!  Luckily fully-automated tools such as ApplicantStack Onboard allow for on the fly updates and customizations.

Ready to implement your new employee onboarding checklist? Download a copy of our checklist here:

New Employee Onboarding Checklist

The Salary Question Ban

The Salary Question Ban

“What’s your current salary?” can no longer be asked when interviewing a candidate for a job.  The law, which bans employers form asking candidates about their salary is an attempt to address the gender pay gap. Women, on average,  still earn about 80 cents to a man’s dollar nationwide, according to the National Women’s Law Center, and the gap has not narrowed substantially in the past decade.

The following states, according to Business Insider, have banned the salary question:

ApplicantStack - Salary Question Ban Map

  • Californiahas banned private and public employers from asking about a candidate’s pay history. The law will take effect in January 2018, according to HRDive.com.
  • Delaware banned all employers from asking candidates about their salary history. The law will take effect in December 2017, according to Duane Morris.
  • Massachusettsprohibited all employers from inquiring about a candidate’s pay history. This law will go into effect in July 2018, according to Mass.gov.
  • New Orleans banned inquiries about all city departments and employees of contractors who work for the city. The rule is already in effect, but, in this case, it only impacts individuals who are interviewing to work for the city of New Orleans, according to WDSU.
  • New York Cityhas banned public and private employees from asking about a candidate’s pay history. The law goes into effect October 31, 2017, Business Insider previously reported.
  • Oregonhas banned all employers for inquiring about a candidate’s salary history. The law goes into effect January 2019according to Jackson Lewis.
  • Philadelphia banned the salary history question for all employers. The rule was supposed to take effect May 23, but a judge halted it temporarily due to a lawsuit from the Chamber of Commerce, according to NBC.
  • Pittsburghbanned city agencies from asking about candidates’ pay history. The rule is effective immediately, but only effects city employees, SHRM reported.
  • Puerto Rico banned employers from inquiring about a candidate’s pay history. The law will go into effect March 2018, according to Jackson Lewis.

New ApplicantStack customers will have applications questionnaires that no longer have the question.  If you would like us to include the question, then please contact support at https://help.www.applicantstack.com/hc/en-us/requests/new

For any existing customer that would like the question removed, please contact us immediately at https://help.www.applicantstack.com/hc/en-us/requests/new and we will remove the question from your application.

IRS Announces 2018 Pension Plan Limitations; 401(k) Contribution Limit Increases to $18,500 for 2018

IRS Announces 2018 Pension Plan Limitations; 401(k) Contribution Limit Increases to $18,500 for 2018

2018 Pension Plan Limitations; 401(k)The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released the following news release  “IRS Announces 2018 Pension Plan Limitations; 401(k) Contribution Limit Increases to $18,500 for 2018”, which includes the Highlights of Changes for 2018.

 

IR-2017-177, Oct. 19, 2017

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today announced cost of living adjustments affecting dollar limitations for pension plans and other retirement-related items for tax year 2018.  The IRS today issued technical guidance detailing these items in Notice 2017-64.

Highlights of Changes for 2018

The contribution limit for employees who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan is increased from $18,000 to $18,500.

The income ranges for determining eligibility to make deductible contributions to traditional Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs), to contribute to Roth IRAs and to claim the saver’s credit all increased for 2018.

Taxpayers can deduct contributions to a traditional IRA if they meet certain conditions. If during the year either the taxpayer or their spouse was covered by a retirement plan at work, the deduction may be reduced, or phased out, until it is eliminated, depending on filing status and income. (If neither the taxpayer nor their spouse is covered by a retirement plan at work, the phase-outs of the deduction do not apply.) Here are the phase-out ranges for 2018:

  • For single taxpayers covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $63,000 to $73,000, up from $62,000 to $72,000.
  • For married couples filing jointly, where the spouse making the IRA contribution is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $101,000 to $121,000, up from $99,000 to $119,000.
  • For an IRA contributor who is not covered by a workplace retirement plan and is married to someone who is covered, the deduction is phased out if the couple’s income is between $189,000 and $199,000, up from $186,000 and $196,000.
  • For a married individual filing a separate return who is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.

The income phase-out range for taxpayers making contributions to a Roth IRA is $120,000 to $135,000 for singles and heads of household, up from $118,000 to $133,000. For married couples filing jointly, the income phase-out range is $189,000 to $199,000, up from $186,000 to $196,000. The phase-out range for a married individual filing a separate return who makes contributions to a Roth IRA is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.

The income limit for the Saver’s Credit (also known as the Retirement Savings Contributions Credit) for low- and moderate-income workers is $63,000 for married couples filing jointly, up from $62,000; $47,250 for heads of household, up from $46,500; and $31,500 for singles and married individuals filing separately, up from $31,000.

Highlights of Limitations that Remain Unchanged from 2017

  • The limit on annual contributions to an IRA remains unchanged at $5,500. The additional catch-up contribution limit for individuals aged 50 and over is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $1,000.
  • The catch-up contribution limit for employees aged 50 and over who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan remains unchanged at $6,000.

Detailed Description of Adjusted and Unchanged Limitations

For more information and details, please see the full article at IRS Announces 2018 Pension Plan Limitations; 401(k) Contribution Limit Increases to $18,500 for 2018