ApplicantStack New Logo

ApplicantStack New Logo

With the recent acquisition of ApplicantStack, we are updating our logo to match the SwipeClock branding. We are excited to unveil our new logo!

We will now be a part of the WorkforceHUB suite:

 

WorkforceHUBLogo.png

WorkforceHUB is a one-stop source for payroll and HR related information. Employees get the information they need through a single portal, saving time and reducing errors or miscommunication.

The portal includes core HR workflows, employee engagement tools, payroll records and easy connection to third-party apps. TimeWorksPlus and TimeSimplicity come plugged into the hub, complete with all their timekeeping and scheduling capability. Employees access the portal via smartphones, tablets or other web-connected devices.

Manage Your Workforce Easier Than Ever

Timekeeping

Punch tracking, job costing, break enforcement, time-off requests, time card approvals and accruals. All TimeWorksPlus features included.

Scheduling

Build schedules based on business need, skills required, labor law constraints, employee preferences and much more. Manage multiple shifts with ease. All TimeSimplicity features included.

Bi-Directional Payroll Integration (select platforms)

Give employees easy access to pay stubs, 1099s, direct deposit receipts and W2s. Empower them to update tax details (W4) and personal information.

Onboarding

Simplify the new hire experience. Step employees through activation, benefits, handbook review and more. Ensure timely and accurate completion of all tasks.

Benefits Enrollment

Streamline benefits renewal and change processes. Provide cost analysis, selected benefits, and benefits summary confirmation. Step employees through enrollment including electronic signature.

Performance Reviews

Add structure to the review process. Create your own questions and track responses. Attach employee and manager review documents. Drive the process to completion.

Managed Workflows

Easily build workflows for any common task. Automate processes that require acknowledgment to ensure compliance.

Alerts/Notifications

Create and display alerts within the portal. Use templates for common alerts. Set triggers by recipient type or hire date. Build custom fields such as next review date. Copy the manager.

Engagement

Publish a company directory and announcements, birthday list, recognition wall and more. Enable an anonymous suggestion box. Provide a document and link library, and require read receipts for key items such as the employee handbook.

LEARN HOW SWIPECLOCK CAN HELP YOU

See why more than 30,000+ employers manage their teams with our products.

Click here to learn more.

For more information about the SwipeClock acquisition, click here to learn more about the acquisition.

How to Ensure Compliance with Company Policies

How to Ensure Compliance with Company Policies

Company policies protect your business from frivolous lawsuits. They are designed to give equal opportunities to all employees, to create a safe work environment, and to inform workers about what they can expect from the leadership team. But even the most well-meaning corporate policies are useless if they aren’t followed consistently and to the letter. Follow these steps to ensure compliance.

1. Create Policies

Do you have company policies? You need to be proactive. Don’t just assume you can come up with coherent, fair policies on the fly as situations arise. If you don’t have policies in place, your HR team needs to make this a priority. Solicit input from managers, but your human resources department has the final say in the policy-making process. You want to create policies that will be best for your company. That might, at times, conflict with what your employees will want.

You should have policies to cover:

  • Holidays, vacations, sick days, and personal leave
  • Performance evaluations and improvement
  • Equal Employment Opportunity
  • Employee classifications
  • Payment schedules, including advances, deductions, and overtime
  • Meals and breaks
  • Terminations

There are several additional policies you may want to create. Will you allow concealed weapons at your place of work? Will you conduct background checks or drug tests on applicants or employees? What is the procedure if one employee accuses another of bullying or harassment? Can employees bring pets to work? Knowing how you’ll proceed before a heated issue comes up helps to ensure compliance because it sets expectations.

2. Spread Awareness

If no one knows what the policies are, it’s impossible to ensure compliance. A full, detailed list of your policies should be readily accessible at all times. Print out a binder and leave it in the employee break room. Give each new hire a hard and digital copy of corporate policies when he or she is hired. Most importantly, go over the policies to verify that the employee understands and agrees to abide by each one. Ignorance should never be an excuse for not following a corporate policy.

Incorporate your corporate policies into your onboarding process. Go beyond uploading the documents to your onboarding software. Your software should allow you to schedule to-do lists for your new hires, and show you whether or not these tasks have been completed. Don’t just make your company policies mandatory reading material. Create a quiz or questionnaire that prompts employees to share their thoughts about policies. It will be good feedback for you, and it will give new hires the chance to really consider each policy and its potential impact.

3. Lead by Example

Compliance starts at the top. If your managers are taking extended lunch breaks, using company property for personal business, or posting unauthorized updates on social media, your employees will either follow suit or become disillusioned with their leadership. Corporate policies are for everyone, from the CEO to the college intern. If anyone in the company doesn’t follow policy, others will believe that they don’t have to, either. Inconsistency is the biggest danger to successful implementation of your corporate policies.

Consistency is about more than trying to ensure compliance. If an employee ever decides to file a lawsuit against your business, precedents will be a part of that lawsuit. Did you follow every HR policy to the letter, or have you been making exceptions for some? This doesn’t mean that you need to blindly enforce your policies. A salaried employee, for example, may not be subject to the same strict rules as an hourly temp. But document any discrepancies and your reasoning behind them to protect the company should an employee file suit.

4. Be Reasonable

You don’t necessarily need to create a hard and fast rule for everything. You should be proactive and have some sort of general guideline for most scenarios, though. If you’re not sure about a certain policy, don’t exclude it from your corporate policies altogether. Instead, note that this situation “will be handled according to the manager’s discretion.” This leaves the door open for you to change policies later on if they don’t seem right for your business.

5. Follow the Law

There are certain policies every business needs to have in place according to federal law. Review your corporate policies with an attorney to ensure compliance with OSHA, labor laws, and other acts. Remember, your company policies are more than a guide or a handbook. In a court of law, they are typically treated as a contract between an employer and its employees. This is not something you want to put off until a situation arises. Create and ensure compliance with corporate policies now to avoid trouble in the future.

How to Hit Recruitment Metrics

How to Hit Recruitment Metrics

If your recruitment metrics have taken a dive recently, you may want to consider investing in recruiting software like an applicant tracking system. But don’t take our word for it! Independent research has found that technology can significantly improve key performance indicators (KPIs) like cost-per-hire, time-to-fill, and quality of hire.  In one survey, 89% of recruiters said that recruiting technology was either “extremely” or “very” important for performing their jobs well.

Reasons Why Companies Don’t Adopt Recruitment Technology

(Source: Software Advice survey)

So what’s the holdup? Why haven’t some companies gotten on board? Don’t let cost be a deterrent. Recruiting software can save you far more money than it costs by lowering your cost-per-hire and time-to-fill, increasing quality of hire, and improving other recruitment metrics. Here are three ways an applicant tracking system can help you hit your recruitment metrics this year.

Hire Faster

A good applicant tracking software is easy to learn and intuitive to use. Some companies worry that they will lose time and productivity as they switch from paper to software. But the long-term benefits of modernizing will surely outweigh the costs of any ramp-up time. The aforementioned report found that 95% of recruiters were able to learn the software with minimal difficulty. One of the major benefits of recruiting technology is a decrease in the amount of time it takes to fill positions. By filling positions faster, the company benefits from the productivity of a larger team right away.

Hire More Easily

You don’t have to be a technology guru to use recruiting software. Aside from quick implementation (especially by cloud-based providers), applicant tracking software is designed to make recruiting easy. You can directly post and promote advertisements to multiple job boards and career search sites with a single click. You can set up templates and automatic email triggers. Hiring managers have a place to collaborate, and candidate information is located in a single repository. An applicant tracking system will streamline and organize the recruiting process.

If you’re currently using a recruiting software and it’s causing you headaches, it’s time to choose another one. Most recruiting software companies offer a free trial so you can get a feel for the system before you buy.

Save Money

Budgeting is critical in business, especially as you’re growing. Some SMBs feel recruiting software isn’t affordable or worth the cost. They stick with a homemade or manual process and miss out on the savings technology offers. The hard truth is that a manual process costs you time, money, and resources. In the long run, you’ll spend more to hire additional staff to take on the work overload and make up for an inefficient process. As your HR department works harder on tasks that could be automated, key recruitment metrics suffer, inadvertently affecting the quality of your new hires. A good recruiting software system enables individuals to streamline the recruiting process, so fewer people are needed to do the work. A recruitment management system is one tool you can use to boost your ROI and your key performance indicators.

Are you having trouble hitting your recruitment metrics? Consider signing up for a free trial of a recruitment management system like ApplicantStack. Not sure how your KPIs look? An applicant tracking software helps with that, too. It automatically tracks and reports your recruiting metrics, so you can see exactly how far you’ve come.

SwipeClock Acquires Applicant Tracking System ApplicantStack

SwipeClock Acquires Applicant Tracking System ApplicantStack

ApplicantStack joins forces with SwipeClock to provide the best HR labor management solutions for SMBs across the country

Cary, NC, Release Date: January 15, 2019.

ApplicantStack has been acquired by workforce management software company, SwipeClock (https://www3.swipeclock.com/) and will be joining their workforce management solution portfolio. SwipeClock provides HR labor management solutions including time & attendance, scheduling and employee self-service software. The addition of ApplicantStack will give them a best-in-class applicant tracking and onboarding solution to add to their product suite.

“We’re excited to join SwipeClock’s family of premier HR solutions for small and medium-sized businesses,” stated Nathan Shackles, CEO of ApplicantStack. “Joining SwipeClock will enable us to further enhance our ApplicantStack Recruit and Onboard products while also providing our customers access to an integrated set of HR labor management solutions.”

ApplicantStack will continue to operate as a division of SwipeClock with the same products and level of service it has in the past. ApplicantStack’s products and services will continue uninterrupted.

“Applicant tracking and timekeeping are among the most compelling requirements for small businesses,” said Coleman Barney, SwipeClock CEO. “The acquisition brings together two extraordinarily complementary products that our partners and their customers can start using right away. This is a natural fit with our strategy to extend and expand our solution with other HR services of value to small and medium businesses.”

About ApplicantStack:

ApplicantStack: the affordable, easy-to-use, full-featured recruiting and onboarding system trusted by 2,500+ companies since 2009 to automate and streamline their recruiting and onboarding process.

We spent our careers in human resources, bogged down with paperwork and craving more time and resources. Our goal is to provide organizations the tool we always wish we had. We created ApplicantStack, a simple, gets-the-job-done software that has everything you need and nothing you don’t. It’s not another thing to manage, but the tool that helps you manage your day.

To learn more please visit: https://www.applicantstack.com/

About SwipeClock:

SwipeClock is a leader in simple and affordable workforce management services. Our more than 1,000 partners have empowered more than 30,000 businesses to reduce labor costs, comply with regulatory mandates, and maximize profits. SwipeClock cloud products (WorkforceHUB, TimeWorksPlus, TimeSimplicity) and hardware clocks (TimeWorksTouch, TimeWorksTUFF and others) provide instant employee access to automated timekeeping, scheduling, leave management, HR dashboards, and other HR resources. With SwipeClock, employers transform labor from a cost of doing business to a competitive advantage.

To learn more please visit:  www.swipeclock.com.

What Makes the Best Recruitment Software?

What Makes the Best Recruitment Software?

There isn’t an applicant tracking system out there that doesn’t purport to be the ‘best recruitment software’ in the business. And a quick Google search reveals a plethora of top ten lists of the best recruitment software available.

But what really makes one software stand out from any other? Once you’ve analyzed which HR recruitment software fit your needs, how can you cull your list down to the best recruitment software bar none? Beyond the bells, whistles, and add-ons, there’s one thing that sets the best software apart.

It’s All About Support

Almost every software company provides some form of technical support for its product. But what does that really mean? Tech support can cover anything from:

  • A huge repository of support documentation and help pages
  • An email form with a response turnaround of 48-72 hours
  • Instant messaging with customer service reps – or with bots
  • A downloadable product manual
  • A FAQ page
  • Discussion boards for users to hash out problems among themselves

Knowing what a vendor means when it says it “provides technical support” can be the difference between a successful and unsuccessful implementation.

Here’s the Catch…

You don’t always know how good (or bad) the tech support is until you need to use it. For example, two companies might both describe their technical support teams as “passionate experts” who are “highly responsive.” Both conjure the image of dedicated representatives standing by to answer every query.

At the first company, you’ve got phone support…but only if you press the right buttons to be directed to the correct department. There, you can leave a message that may or may not reach anyone who can help.

The second company looks exactly the same as the first. But in this case, you’ve got a dedicated account manager you can call directly. He can pull up your account to answer specific questions and refer back to your history. There’s a massive database of support documents covering every imaginable question. And videos accompany most of these help pages, so you can see exactly what you should be doing to fix your problem.

Both companies call it “technical support” – but one is far more helpful than the other!

Questions to Ask

When you’re looking for the best recruitment software vendor, don’t be afraid to ask questions.  Here are some criteria to consider:

  • If you have a question, are you able to speak with someone who is capable of answering? Many companies say they offer live phone support, but your call is sent to a call center. There, the representative will pass your query along to a technical expert to answer at some point. This isn’t really “live” support.
  • Are there other ways to get help? Can you reach out through email? If so, when can you expect a response?
  • Can you help yourself? Browse through the help pages the potential vendor offers. Do they seem to cover lots of different scenarios, or just the basics? It’s far faster to find the answer on your own than to wait for someone to call you back!
  • Will you have one account manager whom you can work with consistently, or do you need to call general support for every issue?
  • Will the support team answer specific questions about your account configuration, or just provide general guidance and links to online help articles?
  • How quickly are you able to get an answer to a question?  Companies often will provide a response time estimate, but the only way to really know is to try it. The best recruitment software offers free trials so you can see what you’re buying. Use this opportunity to test out customer support.
  • What kind of additional help is available beyond product support? You may need assistance configuring your system, customizing features or reports, or training your staff. Is the vendor willing to provide that for an additional fee?

Go beyond the traditional questions about support hours and options so you can figure out exactly what you’re getting with technical support. It’s one of the most important ways to evaluate a vendor, and you can’t rely on a website to give you an accurate impression. Want to know more about what stellar customer service looks like? Contact our team at ApplicantStack! Our customers are all assigned account managers, who are available as needed. We know that customer service sets teams apart. See how we excel.

Types of Unconscious Bias in Hiring

Types of Unconscious Bias in Hiring

The field of psychology has drastic implications for talent acquisition and retention. Psychology is the study of why people do what they do – in essence, what makes people tick. There are certain motivations and fallacies common to much of the population. In many cases, it affects what we say and do.

A cognitive bias is a flaw in judgment. There are dozens of cognitive biases, many of which you are probably familiar with. Think about a coin toss that comes up heads ten times in a row. There’s still a 50% chance that the next flip will be tails – even though it seems unlikely. If you’ve already spent money on something, like an all-you-can-eat buffet, you might gorge yourself to ensure you ‘get your money’s worth.’ This is the sunk cost fallacy. You’ve spent the same amount regardless of how much you eat.

Hiring bias has much more important implications than the examples above. Gender and racial hiring bias are most frequently mentioned, but there are other types of cognitive biases you might be falling victim to. The first step to overcoming a bias is knowing that it might exist.

Types of Cognitive Hiring Bias

The Halo Effect

We all know that first impressions matter. Part of this is because of the halo effect. Once we have a favorable opinion of someone, it takes a lot to change our minds. Another element of the halo effect is the idea that because a person excels in one area, he or she will also excel in others. We might assume that because someone is an excellent public speaker and is especially talented in his field, he will also make a good group leader. In reality, these skills don’t necessarily influence each other.

Expectation Bias

A recruiter might read through dozens of resumes. One candidate looks particularly good “on paper.” When that person comes in for an interview, the recruiter may be more likely to overlook obvious flaws; say, the person doesn’t make eye contact or is inarticulate or incompetent. If you expect someone to be something – whether that’s good or bad – he or she is likely to fulfill those expectations.

Confirmation Bias

Confirmation bias is the tendency to seek out information that validates your current opinion. For example, people who tune into Rush Limbaugh or Glenn Beck are typically more conservative. These pundits espouse beliefs that are congruent with the conservative mindset. As a hiring bias, confirmation bias can be seen in the tendency to focus only on the aspects of a person that coincide with the recruiter’s pre-established thoughts on the candidate.

Anchoring Bias

Anchoring is a hiring bias in which the recruiter or hiring manager fixates on one piece of information, giving it more weight than it deserves. Say, for example, you have a candidate who went to Harvard, or who is president of the local Mensa Society. Even if the candidate isn’t the best for the job, it may be tempting to overlook his or her flaws because “She’s in Mensa!” or “He went to Harvard!”

Social Comparison Bias

This is a tough one for managers who are hiring employees to join their team. The social comparison bias is the tendency to dislike or feel competitive with others who may have the same kinds of skills. For example, if you’re widely seen as the company’s expert in a certain software program, you’ll feel reluctant to hire someone whose skills meet or exceed your own. Research has shown that this is a relatively common phenomenon, so it’s a hiring bias you’ll want to consciously avoid.

Ingroup Bias

Ingroup bias is the tendency to favor people who are similar to oneself, or who are part of the same “group.” It’s an interesting hiring bias because in some cases, like sexism or racism, it’s blatantly seen as wrong. But there are less obvious examples of ingroup bias. Some hiring managers, for example, might look more favorably on fellow alumni. You may feel a sense of camaraderie and kinship with a candidate who participated in the same fraternity or sorority that you joined in school. There are several types of ingroups, but any kind of favoritism based on this is a hiring bias that could negatively impact your hiring decisions.

Shared Information Bias

While this type of bias may not directly affect your candidates, it can certainly draw out the hiring process. Shared information bias is the tendency for members of a group to discuss information that everybody is already aware of, rather than focusing on hidden information that is only available to some. For example, if one interviewer notices an irritating quality in a candidate, he or she should share this with the group – even if it doesn’t seem relevant. Don’t focus on just making a decision. The process is important, too.

Overcome Hiring Bias

Do you know how to recruit in a way that will avoid this? Awareness of these kinds of hiring biases is critical. Many publications have recently suggested that automated intelligence is the solution for removing (or at least significantly decreasing) hiring bias. An applicant tracking system can show or hide certain aspects of a candidate’s profile that you don’t want to consider. You can decrease the shared information bias, since everyone keeps notes in a central location. Hiring bias doesn’t have to be an insurmountable problem. Learn about more tips for avoiding hiring bias here.