7 Underutilized Ways To Extract Maximum Value From Your ATS

7 Underutilized Ways To Extract Maximum Value From Your ATS

Did you choose an ATS because of one or two outstanding features? Great! Now you’ve tamed a couple processes.

Increase ATS ROI

Are you using all the other tools as well? If not, you are leaving ROI on the table.

Here are 7 commonly overlooked ATS (applicant tracking system) features. Are you taking advantage of each one?

7 Underutilized ATS Tools

  1. Prescreening Questionnaires With Knockout Questions
  2. Stage Change Auto-Emails
  3. Recruitment KPI Reports
  4. Manual Links For Niche Job Boards
  5. Targeted Job Descriptions
  6. Process Checklists
  7. Structured Interview Scripts

1. Prescreening Questionnaires

Unfortunately, recruiting has become a race against time. If you want to shorten time-to-fill, this is your answer.

Here’s how pre-screening questionnaires work. Identify the skills and experience required for the job description. Write a question for each must-have qualification. These are aptly named ‘knockout’ questions. For example, ‘Are you proficient in Quark Xpress?’ If the applicant answers ‘No’ the ATS ‘knocks’ them out. Now they are in the ‘Do Not Pursue’ pool.

If you’ve invested in an ATS, there is no reason to review every application you receive. For an entry-level position, 50 percent may be unqualified. For a highly technical position, that number could increase.

Spend your time on the pool of applicants that make it past first-round prescreening.

2. Stage Change Emails

Let automation do its thing. An ATS is a labor-saving device. Trigger an email each time you do a hiring stage change.

For effective auto-emails, use templates and merge fields. These tools allow you to personalize the emails. Create your template using emails you’ve already sent manually.

Merge fields import information you’ve entered elsewhere. For example, your ATS can insert the applicant name, application date, application source, and job description into an email.

Here are examples of auto-emails linked to hiring stage changes:

  • Application Received Stage (‘Thank you for applying. We’ve received your application.’)
  • Do Not Pursue Stage (‘We are moving forward with other candidates. Thank you for your interest in our company.’)
  • Interview Stage (‘We would like to schedule your interview.’)
  • Background and Reference Check Stage (‘We are contacting your references.’)
  • Job Offer Stage (‘Congratulations! We want you to join our team! Your starting date is…’)

An effective applicant journey requires constant personalized communications. Set up stage change emails and never lose a candidate by forgetting to send an email.

Auto-emails aren’t the only thing linked to stage changes. They are just the most common. A stage change can trigger a process like a background or reference check.

3. Hiring KPI Reports

Do you know if your hiring efforts are effective? Do you know if they are improving? Use ATS reports to figure it out.

Here are metrics to track:

  • Time-to-fill
  • Cost-per-hire
  • Job board performance
  • Quality-of-hire
  • Offer acceptance rate
  • Diversity hiring
  • Hires to goal
  • Qualified candidates (number who move past phone screen)
  • Retention rate

4. Manual Links for Non-Supported Job Boards

ATSs automatically post to the most popular job boards. But you may use niche job boards that aren’t supported by your software. Because of this, you may keep those applicants segregated. (Craigslist is a frequent example.)

ATSs have a slick workaround using manual links. When posting your job description to the niche site, insert a link to your ATS. That way, the niche board applicants flow into your database. You won’t have to manually enter them. They will be scored using the same criteria and processed like the applicants from the linked boards.

Save time when posting to non-supported sites. And don’t hesitant to start using additional niche sites.

5. Targeted Job Descriptions

If you are trying to diversify your workforce, create customized job descriptions. Don’t confuse this with job descriptions customized for the position. We’re talking about descriptions customized for a candidate demographic.

Minority groups are underrepresented in many workplaces. Plus there are less-obvious talent pools that can also yield quality hires. What about people who need a flexible schedule? College students? Customers? Retirees re-entering the workforce? Independent contractors seeking a traditional job with health benefits?

While you’re at it, consider where your target demographic hangs out online. For example, LinkedIn attracts a different type of candidate than college job boards. Strategize accordingly.

6. Process Checklists

Ask any Six Sigma expert and they will tell you that process optimization is the key to business success. This applies to hiring processes as well. ATS’ allow you to make custom workflow checklists. Checklists ensure that; 1. Everything gets done, 2. Each hiring team member can check the status in real time, and, 3. You have a record of when tasks were checked off. Checklists also make it easier to assign tasks to members of your hiring team.

7. Structured Interview Questions

Don’t ignore ATS interview scripts. If you are struggling to find quality candidates, improve your interviewing techniques. Structured interviews are an industry best practice that every hiring team should adopt. With structured interviewing questions, all interviewers ask the same questions (in the same order) for every candidate. This prevents unconscious bias and puts all applicants on equal footing. It also allows you to efficiently manage interview scripts for multiple job positions. When your interview questions are stored in your ATS, they are easy to update as needed.

ATS Value: Squeeze Every Last Drop

Your ATS can help you reach your hiring goals—but only if you extract the maximum value from your software.

By Liz Strikwerda

The Ultimate Guide to Onboarding Your Perfect Next Employee

The Ultimate Guide to Onboarding Your Perfect Next Employee

After hiring, onboarding is one of the most important HR functions. Whether large or small, every organization should bring new employees on in a structured and efficient manner.
Do onboarding well and you dramatically increase the odds that you retain top talent in your organization. You may be surprised to learn that:

The details may vary but the fundamentals of onboarding are the same. Certainly, the goals are the same: streamline and accelerate the process that transitions new hires to fully productive employees making a positive contribution to the team.

Onboarding is for Everyone

Onboarding is for everyoneYour onboarding strategy may differ by the type of employee you hire. For example, onboarding an executive may be quite different from onboarding a junior accountant. Similarly, Gartner suggests that hiring and onboarding virtual, gig economy workers takes a heavier emphasis on inclusion and engagement.

Regardless of the employee type or the duration of employment, onboarding is essential. After all, anyone who works for you—even seasonally, part time, or as an intern—represents your company. They affect morale, efficiency, and brand.

In fact, the shorter the likely duration of employment, the more important it is to onboard efficiently and effectively. Onboarding seasonal workers, part-time employees, remote employees and interns is as important as onboarding full-time staff. You can see the value for yourself by watching a short Harvard Business School video featuring three students who talk about their internship onboarding experiences.

The Goldilocks Approach to Onboarding

The best onboarding program finds the right balance between focus on the new hire and productivity of the organization. By organizing and standardizing common tasks, you can make onboarding more efficient for everyone.

Onboarding that is ‘just right’ quickly connects new hires to payroll, gives them the tools they need for the job, and engages them with their workplace and co-workers. Efficient onboarding pays off with higher morale, quicker productivity and a more stable workforce.

Go Beyond Onboarding Checklists

So, what does it mean to onboard well? There are hundreds of articles about onboarding but most focus on the mechanics, providing a laundry list of tasks in a series of checklists that give the illusion that onboarding is a cookie cutter, repeatable process driven by tasks.

Instead, onboarding is a critical process that can affect your corporate culture, productivity and morale. It is about more than just the new hire. You need to do it right. Checklists can help make the process more disciplined and onboarding systems can improve efficiency.

This guide breaks down the onboarding process into several key focus areas to guide your onboarding activities. It also includes some checklists, and strongly recommends you develop your own checklists to increase your odds of success with each candidate.

Focus 1: Make a Good Hire

Focus 1 Make a Good HireOnboarding is only as good as the hire itself. Make sure you follow a strong process for hiring. This includes everything from creating a detailed job description to strategic prescreening, job posting, and making a selection.

A good hire will meet the job requirements and fit your culture. Make sure your team evaluates candidate and provides feedback in a way that allows you to have confidence in your selection.

Applicant tracking systems (ATS) can help organize and amplify your hiring efforts. These systems provide templates, workflows, and shortcuts for creating and posting jobs, gathering candidate applications and evaluating interview feedback. They eliminate paper and speed the hiring process while reducing the time and effort for all involved in the hiring process.

Focus 2: Validate Candidate Background and Ability to Work

Focus 2 Validate the CandidateOnce your selection is made, it’s time to verify eligibility to work. Now is the time to release the candidate if there are any surprises. Do a thorough background check.

  • Call references. If you haven’t done so yet, check the references provided by your candidate. Use a standardized questionnaire to ensure that you conform to rules and gather feedback in a consistent manner. Or better yet, use an applicant tracking system to automate this step by triggering an email to the references.
  • Verify qualifications. If there are absolute requirements like holding a valid driver’s license, make sure you get independent confirmation. This can be part of a background check service.
  • Run a background check. The easiest and fastest way to do this is to use a professional service. Make this part of your standard onboarding process to be thorough.
  • Check social media. Review top social media platforms to see if there are any red flags to indicate you need further discussion with the candidate.
  • Drug test. Many organizations require drug testing prior to employment because of potential workplace liability. Use a professional service to conduct this independent testing.

Applicant tracking and onboarding systems can streamline this essential process through checklists and automation.

Focus 3: Leverage Federal, State, Local Incentives and Programs

Focus 3 Leverage FSL ProgramsOnce the candidate makes it past background checks and drug testing, it is time to make an offer. You have done everything you can to ensure that the candidate is a good match for your need. Now is a good time to see if your company is eligible for a tax credit if you hire the candidate.

Work Opportunity Tax Credit

The federal Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) program is designed to give companies incentives for hiring certain target groups as a way to reduce unemployment. WOTC targeted groups include certain recipients of TANF, veterans, disabled veterans and felons.

To start the process, be sure to have the candidate fill out the relevant forms on or before the offer date. You will also have to file all paperwork within the first 28 days.

WOTC Forms include:

Your tax credit can be in the thousands per qualified employee, so filling out the paperwork is certainly worth the effort. Be sure to include it in your onboarding process. You will also need to track hours worked, as there is a minimum for eligibility and an escalation to a maximum.

Don’t leave money on the table. Ask all your candidates to fill out form 8850. If the forms handling process is too burdensome for you, look for an outsourcer like Efficient Hire. They can manage the entire filing, tracking and reporting process for you for a percentage of your credit. You only pay if you receive the credit.

Other Federal, State and Local Hiring Incentive Programs

There may also be other federal, state and local programs that provide incentives for hiring. Make sure you are well aware and include them in your onboarding efforts up front. Examples include state point of hire credits, federal Indian credit, and the Georgia job tax credit.

Focus 4: Payroll and Benefits Readiness (between Offer and Hire Dates)

Focus 4 Payroll and Benefits ReadinessThe goal of payroll and benefits readiness is a smooth first day on the job without all the paperwork hassles. Make a list of everything you need from the new hire related to payroll and benefits. Use automation to gather as much of this data as you can.
It is in everyone’s interest to get payroll set up ahead of the start date. Be sure to consult legal counsel regarding any compliance issue created by onboarding activities performed off-the-clock prior to report date.

Common forms and details that new hires complete include:

  • Federal W4 Form
  • Federal I9 Form
  • State withholding forms
  • Direct deposit details and authorization
  • Emergency contact

On the hiring side, payroll details include:

  • Employee details including social security number
  • Job assignment
  • Department
  • Employee ID
  • Offer Date
  • Hire Date

For example, applicant tracking software can help you make the transition to onboarding by collecting and storing important candidate information such as name and contact information. Fully-integrated applicant tracking can deliver this information to your onboarding system so that you don’t have to re-enter or track this information separately. It may seem trivial, but it is helpful, saves time, and provides a chain of custody (so to speak) of information on your candidate all the way back to the receipt of their resume.

Time tracking is a critical element of payroll readiness. Timekeeping systems make it easy to track employee work hours, design schedules, accrue time off and manage requests, approve time cards, job cost and more. With all the compliance issues related to workforce management, modern timekeeping makes sense for every organization.

Add your new hire to your timekeeping system, with a schedule beginning on the report date. Your new hire will then be able to clock in at the beginning of their first day on the job. The data from your timekeeping system can then feed into the payroll system for payment of wages earned in the first pay period.

Remote Data Gathering

Your goal should be to have new hires complete all payroll and benefits related forms prior to reporting for work on Day 1. Make this something that the new hire can complete remotely. Let them work from their own device and at their own pace. This makes it more convenient for everyone, and more likely that the new hire has access to the right documentation to fill out the various forms.

Your candidate should be able to log into an employee portal and see a list of documents that need to be completed prior to their first day. It helps to provide a checklist, so they can track their progress. Checklists also provide you with alerts and reporting that help you measure the onboarding process and see where follow-up needs to occur. Checklists can also save time when onboarding multiple new employees at once.

Mobile access can make this process much more efficient. Allow documents to be electronically signed and look for onboarding that tracks engagement. Allowing new employees to use their mobile device also comes in handy when you need them to take a photo of their driver’s license (for example) and upload for your records. Questionnaires can help you measure comprehension and helps establish a basis for performance reviews and even formal reprimand.

Benefits Selection

Some benefits are immediately available while others become available after time on the job. Share as much information as you can early on and consider having the new hire to fill out forms ahead of eligibility, if practical. This may accelerate the enrollment process once the new hire is eligible.

Benefit forms may include:

  • Healthcare enrollment
  • Life insurance
  • Health savings account
  • Retirement plans
  • Disability insurance
  • FLSA

Focus 5: Workspace Readiness, Space Allocation and Technology Provisioning (before Day 1)

Focus 5 Workspace Readiness, Space Allocation and Technology ProvisioningIf your new hire will have an assigned space, assign it now. Prep the space with the various technology and supplies needed on day one. These may include:

  • Phone extension
  • Email address
  • Computer
  • Network connection
  • Software and apps passwords
  • Furniture
  • Paper, pens, and other office supplies

If your new hire works in a shared space, you may need:

  • Locker/storage
  • Network connection
  • Uniform
  • Pen, paper, and other supplies

The goal here is to have the work environment ready day one so the employee can start contributing immediately, whatever their job.

Using an employee onboarding system can help streamline these activities by assigning each task to the individual responsible. Adding reminders will ensure that nothing slips through the cracks.

Day One Planning to Ensure a Good Experience for All

Make a list of everything that should happen on day one. Think about day one from the perspective of the new hire, hiring manager, and co-workers. This is the beginning of a successful onboarding program.

  • Logistics
    • Parking
    • Lunchroom
    • Bathroom
    • Timeclocks
    • Supply room
    • Door entry
  • Safety
    • Fire alarms
    • Fire extinguishers
    • Workplace hazards
    • Emergency exits
  • Introductions
    • Team introductions
    • Email/collaboration tool introductions

Every workplace is different. Build the right list for your organization with the goal of smooth introduction to the workplace. Make it a knock-out day one!

Focus 6: Compliance and Alignment (between Offer and End of First Week, Ongoing)

Focus 6 Compliance and AlignmentPolicies and procedures are really important. Be clear. This is about compliance, clarification, culture and connection—what SHRM calls the 4 Cs.

Every new hire should receive a copy of the employee handbook and any other policies and procedures not included in the handbook and relevant to their job.

  • Employee handbook
  • PTO policy
  • Sick leave policy
  • Expense reimbursement policy
  • Bonus plan
  • At-will employee contract

Make sure your new hire understands formal protocol for things like legal representation, press representation, authorizations, approvals, chain of command and other organizational authority.

Get them familiar with emergency protocol, too; fire escape plans, emergency plans, etc.

An employee onboarding system can automatically attach items listed above as a standard to all new employees, which can easily be accessed via the employee portal at any time.

Focus 7: Engagement and Fit

Focus 7 Engagement and FitThe most critical function of onboarding is equipping the new hire with the tools necessary to be a successful contributor to the organization. The peak of activity is at the front-end, when the employee is added to systems like payroll, offered benefits, allocated space, and informed of rules and operating practices.

Beyond the initial flurry of activity lie two related and very serious success factors—engagement and fit. New hires need to integrate into the organization—to become part of the whole and contribute their unique value without subordinating their individuality.

You can foster initial engagement by activities such as:

  • Introducing the new hire to immediate co-workers
  • Notifying all employees and welcoming the new hire via email or portal
  • Inviting the new hire to company social events like lunch-and-learn and birthday celebrations
  • Give new hires an option to provide some personal tidbits like hobbies, associations, and favorite cartoon character to stimulate conversation
  • Assign the new hire a clear, short-term project to focus energy and demonstrate competence

Mentoring and Shadowing Programs

Another way to foster early engagement is through mentoring for new hires. Mentoring programs can be highly effective in connecting new hires to their jobs and co-workers. They can also provide a sense of long-term opportunity for growth. Similarly, shadowing programs can be helpful in learning jobs on-the-go, which can be very effective in retail, restaurant, repair, manufacturing and other environments.

Just be careful not to go overboard on mentoring. New hires need a sense of autonomy and contribution, and current employees need to feel that they are on track to achieve their own objectives. If you offer a mentoring program, be sure to establish boundaries, set goals, and evaluate effectiveness for both mentor and mentored.

Shadowing is a short-term program. Mentoring, however, can be continued over much longer time periods. If you choose to keep it going, make sure you establish goals for both mentor and mentored and revisit on a regular basis.

Performance Reviews

Performance reviews should be regular and two-directional across the course of the first year of employment. These reviews help the hiring manager, HR and the new hire measure the new hire’s achievements as well as identify areas of improvement for everyone involved. They can be as simple as a checklist for discussion or more formal.

Frequency for performance reviews varies by job and industry but commonly starts with day 1 and week 1, followed by monthly and eventually moves to annually. These reviews are an opportunity to build rapport and adjust the onboarding process to suit individual needs. Set an expectation that new hires are encouraged and even expected to gallop out of the gate.

Organizational Fit and Cultural Fit

Fit is a key factor in long-term success for both you and the new hire. This factor should be considered long before onboarding. One of the very first steps of the hiring process has to be a clear understanding of organizational need that is translated into a job description.

Most employers have budgeting and requisitioning processes that help ensure that there is a true organizational need for the new hire. Well written job descriptions and a good screening and interview process help ensure that the new hire is an organizational fit. Put that work in during the hiring process and you have a much better chance that the new hire fits in. Take the organizational fit into consideration during the onboarding process as well to help the new hire understand clearly their role in the overall success of the company.

Cultural fit can be more difficult and nuanced. Introduce the culture early and often, and don’t expect a new hire to be a change agent. This rarely works and usually ends badly.

Keep the Good. Lose the Bad.

Work hard to keep your good hires as part of the organization. The cost to replace and the loss of momentum is steep.

Bad hires, though, are best lost early. Identify mistakes early. If you make an error in hiring, correct it early. Keeping an employee who is not a fit causes bigger problems. Some companies incorporate a quit now bonus into the onboarding process as a check against bad hiring decisions. If all else fails, fire fast!

How Manager Feedback and Interview Evaluations Improve Hiring in 2019

How Manager Feedback and Interview Evaluations Improve Hiring in 2019

You currently have a mission-critical position to fill and a fairly tight deadline to hire a qualified person to do the job. You have posted the position on your website and other outside resources like Monster, CareerBuilder, Indeed and Craigslist.

What comes next is a stack of resumes. Followed by the interview process. In 2019, you’re competing with many other companies to find the best talent. You can’t afford a slowdown in your process. The top candidate could be hired by your competitor. But you need to proceed strategically so you don’t hire the wrong person.

The Interview Feedback Review Process

You pick up the first resume and encounter some mission statements like…

  • “Motivated individual seeks challenging position for personal and professional growth”
  • “Industry expert and thought leader available to implement revenue-ramping methodologies.”
  • “Professional guru with proven track record of driving key performance metrics seeks next challenging opportunity.”

…and you then proceed to read through four more pages of the resume. Buried in the resume amid the industry keywords and buzzwords is the information that is relevant to your open position. After reading about 10 of these resumes, you can’t remember which candidate had which qualifications. It’s a good idea to organize the applicants into categories like “Unqualified”, “Potential” and “Top Prospect” as you are reviewing the resumes so you can focus on the shortlist of more qualified candidates when you revisit them.

The next step in the process is to make every effort to forward only the best applicants to your manager for review, so you don’t waste the manager’s time and earn his/her confidence that you understand the critical needs.

Obtaining Interview Feedback

One of the most challenging aspects of the hiring process is about to occur… obtaining useful feedback from your staff during this review process. No matter how many employees you engage in the hiring process, it’s important that you gather the feedback in a consistent and meaningful way. One of the best ways to standardize feedback is to create candidate evaluation forms and request that they are filled out by your managers and staff during the review process.

Candidate Evaluation Forms For Interview Feedback

What is a candidate evaluation form? It’s a tool that allows members of the hiring team to rate applicants based on the same criteria.

How Does a Candidate Evaluation Form Improve Recruiting?

1. It ensures each interviewer is thorough in their evaluation
2. It speeds up the interview feedback process
3. It helps prevent bias in job interview evaluation
4. It measures hard and soft skills
5. It simplifies collaboration among your hiring team
6. It helps differentiate candidates with near-identical qualifications
7. It saves time when first-round rejected candidates are considered for future positions
8. The systemized scoring increases the usefulness of your talent pipeline database

Standardize Interview Feedback

Utilizing multiple choice, ratings or scale questions when requesting feedback may prevent receiving vague reasons they are not interested and emails that are difficult to interpret. While you will find feedback questionnaires helpful during the review process, you will find them even more necessary after the applicant has been interviewed.

When each member of the hiring team contributes to the interview feedback form, you elevate the entire process. Each person’s perspective and expertise improves the scoring. The result? You will find best-fit employees quickly.

Job Interview Evaluation Comments Samples

Here are some examples of effective interview feedback evaluation forms. You can modify them as appropriate for the specific position. For example, if the position requires additional skills not listed here, add the skills to the first evaluation sample.

Interview Feedback Examples (Pre Interview)

Very often the manager reads the candidate’s resume and uses a gut feeling to determine if the candidate should be considered. They may even make a judgment based on the resume format, the number of jobs and where they went to school. If you ask the manager exactly what it is they liked or didn’t like, you will receive more meaningful information and can make a more informed decision about whether you should invite this candidate in for an actual face to face interview.

Pre interview questionnaire

Examples of Effective Manager Feedback Questions (Post Interview)

The feedback you receive from the staff involved in the face to face interview can also be based on more fair and factual information if guidelines for evaluation are distributed. It is recommended that the skills or competencies needed to be successful in the job are listed so the interviewer can explore these areas during the interview and rate each candidate effectively. Please note the two different examples below.

Negative/Positive Interview Comments Example #1

Post Interview 1-1

Post Interview 1-2

Post Interview 1-3

Negative/Positive Interview Comments Example #2

Post Interview 2-1

How Job Interview Feedback Fits in the Applicant Journey

Job interview evaluation influences other applicant touchpoints. As such, it can help you improve job descriptions, interview scripts, and other candidate communications.

It also helps members of your hiring team become better at evaluating candidates. It’s a key best practice for any company that is serious about improving hiring outcomes.

Benefits of a Structured Interview Feedback Process

  1. Avoids typical evaluations of candidates that may be filled with ambiguity, superficial statements, and generalizations.
  2. Your hiring decision is based on objective information that the candidate’s skills match your job or project requirements—not because they are an excellent resume writer.
  3. The standardized evaluation questions point out the different opinions of the interview/ evaluation staff and help raise any red flags about the candidate.
  4. Ensures your hiring process is in compliance with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).
  5. Helps avoid costly hiring mistakes.
  6. Using multiple selection methods helps to ensure you are choosing the best candidate–No single technique on its own can predict on-the-job performance and success.
  7. Streamlines the process and ensure a better, fit—increasing employee retention and productivity.
New Employee Onboarding Checklist for 2019

New Employee Onboarding Checklist for 2019

Onboarding a new employee can be quite challenging and time-consuming.  Every phase of the employee onboarding process is important, so make sure to have a new hire checklist to onboard your new employee.  You can use the following outline as a guide, however, every organization will have its own unique requirements.  These tasks will need to be adjusted for the type of employment (full time, part time, seasonal), but having an initial, general list will provide a good starting point for different positions.  We have outlined a new employee onboarding checklist to make it less daunting.

Step 1:

Create a list of tasks that new employees will need to complete and that current team members will need to work on/setup prior to the new employees first day.  Example tasks to put on new hire checklist could include, but are not limited to:

Prepare any State & Federal tax forms that need to be completed.  Some of these forms might require input from multiple individuals.  Having a system in place where these can be created and completed online can save time and resources.  The ability to upload these forms form a library can be beneficial to any busy HR professional.

Prepare any job-related forms that will need to be completed and/or signed by the employee or current team member.  Having a system in place to easily upload and create fillable forms can make this task much easier.

Gather any health insurance forms and benefits information

Identify any computer or other peripheral needs that need to be set up prior to the employee arriving on the first-day

Order any technology equipment

Order phone and create new extension

Obtain a new photo ID

Order business cards

Order any materials/supplies needed by the new employee

Make any arrangements for parking/transportation

Add new employee to relevant email lists

Identify any socialization tasks such as a tour of facilities or welcome lunch/meeting

Step 2:

Put together any supporting documents and links to any videos.  These should be items that do not require any input or signatures.  Example supporting documents might be included on a new hire checklist include, but are not limited to:

Welcome message for new employees

Contact namesNew Hire checklist - library

Phone/extension list

Any training material or videos that will need to be watched

Benefit packages to review

 

Step 3:

Assign tasks from the new employee onboarding checklist to current team members and new hires.  An automated process for task reminders is an invaluable tool.  Having the ability to set deadlines with reminders will ensure that the tasks will get done.  It is also helpful to be able to visually see the progress indicators that show any outstanding tasks.

Assign all tasks to any relevant person with a due datenew hire checklist - checklist

Order assignments according to time needed to complete tasks and dependencies between tasks

Create email remainders

Monitor completion of tasks on the new hire checklist

Step 4:

Establish clear communication with the new hire.  Having an employee portal to facilitate the new hire checklist can make this much easier.  An employee portal can be viewed as their own virtual assistant that can help the onboarding process run smoothly.  Here are some items to include when using a portal:

Their manager’s contact information

List of tasks from the new hire checklist

Any materials that they need to review and/or sign (from Steps 1 & 2) A progress indicator and list of deadlines to help the new hire complete all the tasks

Step 5:

Review your plan and make the necessary tweaks for the next employee.  Don’t assume that one new hire checklist is going to fit all employees!  Luckily fully-automated tools such as ApplicantStack Onboard allow for on the fly updates and customizations.

Ready to implement your new employee onboarding checklist? Download a copy of our checklist here:

New Employee Onboarding Checklist

 

HR Conferences: You Can Still Attend a Great One in 2019!

HR Conferences: You Can Still Attend a Great One in 2019!

We are well into Q2 2019 but there are still some worthwhile HR conferences on the calendar. If you are thinking about registering, don’t delay. Rates go up in the weeks just before the conference.

Why Attend A Human Resources Conference?

The Human Resources profession is broad and dynamic. To be successful, you need ongoing training. In both your core specialty and all the peripheral skills you use daily. HR conferences provide an intense educational experience neatly packaged in a couple of days.

If your job requires you to keep a certification up-to-date, this is an easy way to do it. Most HR conferences allow you to earn HRCI or SHRM credit.

A conference also gives you a welcome break from your day-to-day routine. You will return with new tools (and new perspectives) to tackle the HR problems at your company.

Networking with peers is also invaluable. You can discuss issues in-depth and gain insights from your counterparts in diverse industries and locations. (A connection you make may also yield a job opportunity down the road.)

Here are ApplicantStack’s picks for the best conferences from May – December 2019.

 

1. World at Work 2019 Rewards and Compensation Conference

  • May 6-8, 2019
  • Orlando, FL
  • For: HR generalists, compensation and benefits specialists, compliance managers

 

2. Inclusive Diversity Conference: HR Call to Action Conference

  • May 6-7, 2019
  • San Francisco, CA and online
  • Host: HCI (Human Capital Institute)
  • Earn HRCI and SHRM credit

 

3. APA 2019 Annual Congress

  • May 14-18, 2019
  • Long Beach, CA
  • Host: American Payroll Association
  • For: Professionals who work in payroll, accounts payable, HR or accounting technology, benefits

 

4. ATD (Association for Talent Development) 2019 International Conference & Exposition

  • May 19-22, 2019
  • Washington D.C.
  • Online rate ends May 14
  • For: HR specialists and generalists
  • Keynote speaker: Oprah Winfrey

 

5. HCI 2019 Strategic Talent Acquisition Conference

  • June 10-12, 2019
  • Denver, CO
  • Host: Human Capital Institute (HCI)
  • Earn SHRM Credits
  • Topics covered:
    • Workplace Strategy
    • Technology
    • Business Acumen & Metrics
    • Compliance
    • Global HR
    • Leadership
    • Communication
    • Talent
    • Compensation & Benefits

 

6. SHRM (The Society for Human Resource Management) 2019 Annual Conference

  • June 23-26, 2019
  • Las Vegas, NV
  • For: HR generalists and all specialties
  • Keynote speakers: Martha Stewart, Brene Brown
  • Entertainment: Lionel Richie
  • Earn SHRM credits

 

7. World at Work Executive Compensation Forum

  • July 28-30, 2019
  • Denver, CO
  • For: Compensation specialists

 

8. HCI 2019 Employee Engagement Conference

  • July 29-31, 2019
  • Denver, CO
  • Host: Human Capital Institute (HCI)
  • For: HR professionals interested in employee engagement programs

 

9. California HR Conference

  • August 19-21, 2019
  • Long Beach, CA
  • Host: Professionals In Human Resources Association
  • Early rate ends May 31
  • For: California-based HR generalists and specialists
  • Earn HRCI and SHRM credits

 

10. HR Florida Conference and Expo

  • August 25-28, 2019
  • Orlando, FL
  • Host: HR Florida State Council
  • For: Florida-based HR generalists and specialists
  • Earn HRCI and SHRM credits

 

11. 2019 Learning and Leadership Development Conference

  • Conference: September 10-12, 2019
  • Course: September 12-13, 2019
  • Boston, MA
  • Discount rate ends May 19
  • Host: Human Capital Institute (HCI)
  • For: Talent acquisition specialists, corporate coaches

 

12. Texas SHRM Global HR Conference

  • September 11, 2019
  • Houston, TX
  • Host: Texan Society of Human Resources Management (SHRM)
  • For: Texas-based HR generalists and specialists

 

13. 2019 Ohio HR Conference

  • September 18-20, 2019
  • Columbus, OH
  • Host: Ohio SHRM State Council
  • For: Ohio-based HR generalists and specialists

 

14. ASHHRA Annual Conference and Exposition

  • September 21-24, 2019
  • Chicago, IL
  • Host: The American Society for Healthcare Human Resources Administration
  • Special rate ends June 30
  • For: Human resources generalists and specialists who work in healthcare

 

15. TAtechNorthAmerica

  • September 24-26, 2019
  • Austin, Texas
  • Host: The Association for Talent Acquisition Solutions
  • Early rate ends June 26
  • For: Businesses that develop and market technology-based recruiting products and services
    • Corporate TA executives and recruiters
    • Applicant tracking system providers
    • Data and analytics companies
    • Job boards/search engines/aggregators
    • Online publishers
    • Recruitment marketers
    • AI and machine learning companies
    • Staffing firm executives

 

16. IPMA-HR International Training Conference

  • September 22-25, 2019
  • Miami, FL
  • Host: International Public Management Association for Human Resources
  • For: HR generalists and specialists

 

17. Talent Connect

  • September 25-27, 2019
  • Dallas, TX
  • Host: LinkedIn
  • For: Human resources generalists and talent acquisition/development specialists

 

18. HR Technology Conference

  • October 1-4, 2019
  • Las Vegas, NV
  • Host: LRP Publications, Human Resource Executive
  • For: Professionals who work in HR technology

 

19. CUPA-HR Annual Conference 2019

  • October 20-22, 2019
  • Aurora, CO
  • Host: College and University Professional Association for Human Resources
  • For: Human resource professionals working in higher education

 

20. CWC 2019 Compliance Conference

  • October 23-25, 2019
  • Nashville, TN
  • Host: The Center for Workplace Compliance
  • For: Members of the host association The Center for Workplace Compliance  (Membership information can be found on their website)

 

21. 2019 Strategic HR Forum

  • October 27-29, 2019
  • Boston, MA
  • Host: SHRM Executive Network HR People & Strategy
  • For: Senior HR professionals

 

22. The HRSouthwest Conference

  • October 27-30, 2019
  • Fort Worth, TX
  • Host: Dallas HR
  • For: Southwest U.S.-based HR generalists and specialists

 

23. HR Comply

  • November 14-15, 2019
  • Nashville, TN
  • Host: Business and Legal Resources
  • For: Senior HR professionals, executives, business owners, employment law specialists, compliance managers

 

How To Get The Most Out Of An HR Conference

Research the classes and presenters. List the sessions you want to attend. If you are bringing team members, divide and conquer. You may be tempted to attend sessions as a group (we hope you are friends), but you will miss the concurrent events. Maximize your investment by spreading out. You can share what you learned with scheduled co-training after the conference.

Write down questions you want to ask the speakers. When you get to the conference, review your notes and questions so you don’t forget anything.

How To Convince Your Boss To Let You Go

Plan ahead. Research conferences early. This will give you time to get approval (and craft your pitch). Follow company policy for conference requests. Write a letter to the decision maker if required. Keep it short and to the point. Include the questions you are planning to ask presenters. Explain how each class/workshop will solve an HR problem in your company. If you are in charge of the departmental budget—make sure you allocate the funds for registration, travel, and lodging.

Indeed Sponsored Jobs with ApplicantStack

Indeed Sponsored Jobs with ApplicantStack

ApplicantStack’s new Indeed Sponsored Jobs integration boosts job visibility and analytics

At ApplicantStack, we’re always looking for ways to help employers find the right talent, fast. That’s why we’re excited to partner with Indeed and launch our new Indeed Sponsored Jobs integration. The integration lets you promote your jobs on Indeed using ApplicantStack, and gives you the performance data you need to optimize your hiring.

Shine the spotlight on your need-to-fill roles

While all of your public jobs in ApplicantStack are searchable on Indeed, as jobs similar to yours are added, older postings naturally “fall back” in search results and lose visibility over time. To give your jobs greater visibility on Indeed, you can pay to promote them as Sponsored Jobs. Sponsored Jobs appear prominently in Indeed’s search results, and they receive up to 5X more clicks 1.

Track and analyze your sponsored campaigns

This new integration brings you the robust data and analytics you need to evaluate your Indeed Sponsored Jobs campaigns. Because you will use a company-specific Indeed account to sponsor jobs, you’ll have access to their Employer Dashboard. The Employer Dashboard lets you see the clicks, applies, and other metrics associated with your sponsored campaign.

Easily measure and share campaign ROI

Your Indeed Employer Dashboard gives you the data you need to assess campaign performance.

Indeed Dashboard for sponsored jobs

See at a glance how many times your sponsored jobs have been seen and clicked on, and what your average cost per click is, so you can confidently report on current performance, and use that data to help plan future sponsored campaigns.

Get started

When you create new jobs in ApplicantStack, you’ll be asked if you want to sponsor them before you post. If you don’t have an Indeed account, you’ll be prompted to create one when you sponsor a job. Once you’ve completed your first sponsorship in ApplicantStack, visit https://ads.indeed.com/job/ads to verify that your campaign is live and your account is set up correctly.

Want to sponsor an existing job? You can start today in just a few easy steps:

1. Choose the job(s) you want to sponsor in ApplicantStack
2. Click “Sponsor Job on Indeed”

Indeed Sponsored Job screenshot

 

3. Select your budget (and provide a phone number if you’d like Indeed to call you)
4. If this is your first time sponsoring, visit https://ads.indeed.com/job/ads to verify that your campaign is live and to complete your one-time account setup

If you have questions about this new integration, please contact us via the support portal link within your account.

For questions about Sponsored Jobs on Indeed, you can contact them via email at sjisupport@indeed.com or visit their Help Center.

 

Please note that a valid Indeed account is required before your Sponsored Job campaign can go live, so be sure to verify that your account is set up correctly at https://ads.indeed.com/job/ads .

1 Indeed data (worldwide)