9 Fresh Recruiting Ideas For 2020 + 10 Best Practices

9 Fresh Recruiting Ideas For 2020 + 10 Best Practices

Surpass your hiring targets in 2020 with fresh recruiting ideas. Add new tricks to your repertoire.

9 Fresh Recruiting Ideas for 2020 + 10 Tried and True

The techniques presented here worked for the companies that used them. Some may work for your organization. Or use them as inspiration to come up with your own.

1. Target Employees Recently Laid Off

A Mumbai-based firm took advantage of huge layoffs at competing start-ups. They bought Facebook and Twitter ads with messages like ‘Got Laid Off & Having Sleepless Nights? We are Hiring!’ (Source)

2. Offer Free Training to the First 10 Ad Responders

Mike Surikov needed three people with advanced MS Office and VBA skills. He posted an ad offering the first ten people free, fast-paced training.

Within a day I had enough people respond. A week later, I started the training both remote and occasionally meeting in a classroom. After three months I had an idea of who learns how, their personalities, if they’re easy to work with and how their attendance is. I also knew their exact skill level. At the last day, I asked the ones that I thought would be a good fit if they wanted a job. Three said yes. Hired them and it’s been going really well. (Source)

3. Use a Recruiting Chatbot

Intel created an informational chatbot for website visitors. (In other words, potential hires.) The response thread was customized with information according to the users’ questions. (Source)

4. Use Your ATS Tools for Career Counselors

Establish relationships with career counselors at applicable schools. The tools in your ATS can help. Connect frequently. They will start referring promising grads.

5. Employee Video Competition

Set up an employee video competition. Individual employees (or teams) create a short video using their cell phones. The purpose of the video is to highlight your company culture in creative ways. Give prizes to the winners. Post the best videos on your careers page, LinkedIn, and social media.

6. Host a Poker Tournament

Caesars Entertainment in Las Vegas invited top-tier MBA students to a poker competition/meet-and-greet. (Source)

7. Use a Wrapped RV as a Mobile Hiring Center

REES Capital founder Amy Rees Anderson bought a large RV and wrapped it with a company job ad. Then she parked it in public lots next to companies where she wanted to poach employees. Impressive chutzpah! (Source)

8. Internships for People Returning to the Workforce

GoldmanSachs helps fill its talent needs by welcoming non-traditional candidates with resume gaps. The internship program is aimed at parents who took a break from work to raise children. And veterans who didn’t return immediately to work after deployment. (Source)

9. Movie Theater Video Ads

Pitch to a captive local audience waiting for the show to start.

We asked employees to create their own 6-second video at home of them performing their dumbest talent ever. We told them to be as silly and random as possible. Then I had my graphics person create an intro slide for the video that showed our company logo and then flashed the words ‘Featuring the Elite Talent of [Company Name].’ We also created a closing slide that asked “What is Your Elite Talent? Apply now” with our recruiting web address displayed on screen. (Source)

10 Best Practices You May Not Be Using

Let’s talk about recruiting methods that aren’t necessarily ingenious. But they will take your basic best practices to the next level.

  1. Create a 2020 hiring plan. We give you step-by-step instructions here.
  2. Write an Employment Value Proposition (EVP) and include it in your job descriptions and on your careers page.
  3. Conduct ‘stay’ interviews. Ask engaged employees why they enjoy working at your company. Use their responses to flesh out your EVP.
  4. For hard-to-fill positions, where possible, loosen education requirements if the candidate has the necessary on-the-job experience.
  5. Turn job descriptions upside-down. Lead with what your company can provide the candidate. Instead of tacking it on the end as an afterthought.
  6. Tout your humanitarian initiatives in job descriptions. If your company is eco-responsible, make sure that is included as well.
  7. Make a company career paths infographic. Post on your careers page and social media sites.
  8. Ask your vendors and business partners for resumes.
  9. Consider moving some onsite job roles to remote positions. Your hiring pool will expand exponentially.
  10. Use EVERYTHING your ATS does. As an ATS provider, we see some clients fail to take advantage of everything our robust platform does. We list several underutilized features here.

If you try some of these recruiting ideas, let us know how it goes. Good luck!

By Liz Strikwerda

How Can You Improve Your Job Requisition Approval Process?

How Can You Improve Your Job Requisition Approval Process?

Improve your hiring outcomes by improving your job requisition process.

Let’s discuss how.

What’s a Job Requisition?

When a department manager needs to hire a new employee, they submit a job requisition.

A job requisition starts the hiring process. With the requisition, the department manager asks for approval for the new employee. If the requisition is denied, the process doesn’t go any further. The denied requisition is stored in the HR software.

The job requisition standardizes the process of filling a position. Applicant tracking systems (ATS) have templates for creating job requisitions. Plus tools to manage the approval process.

A job requisition includes the following:

  • Requisition reference number
  • Job title
  • Type of employment (full-time, temporary, contract, etc.)
  • Name of hiring manager making the request
  • Job description
  • Department or team the employee will be a part of
  • Salary, hourly wage, or pay grade, benefits
  • Type of position: new hire or replacement
  • Hiring budget approval
  • Fill/start date
  • Whether the job description is new or existing

Why Is It Important To Have a Formal Job Requisition Process?

Human Resources professionals understand the importance of standardization. Formalizing and documenting is vital for end-to-end processes and all the sub-steps.

The job requisition process is no different. And the fact that it comes first is not insignificant. Any multi-step operation needs to start on the right foot. Otherwise, it will need to be corrected down the line. At that point, you’ve wasted time and money.

Few things are as important as the quality of the employees on your team. Formalization ensures the process is done correctly. It sets expectations for everyone involved. And you can’t improve a process until you identify exactly what is going on.

Let’s talk about best practices for creating job requisitions.

How Do I Write a Job Requisition?

1. Follow The Approval Process

Job requisitions may need to be approved by Human Resources. In some companies, upper management needs to sign off on new positions. Follow your company policies before proceeding.

2. Justify The Need

Why do you need a new employee? Is it a new position? Is it because someone quit or was promoted? How is the position tied to KPIs? Make a timeline for the job responsibilities. Define exactly what is expected.

3. Write a Good Job Description

A job description is a detailed listing of required qualifications and experience, job duties, and other necessary information about the position. It also includes the salary range, benefits, and information about the company.

Will the requisition be filled by an outside recruiting agency? Remember that they don’t have your institutional knowledge. Include all the necessary details.

We cover how to create a job description thoroughly in our How To Hire Your Next Employee Series. Follow the steps to write a spot-on description for your requisition.

Job Requisition Glossary

If you are new to the hiring process, it’s helpful to understand the HR-speak as it relates to job requisitions.

Open Requisition: An active requisition that hasn’t been filled or closed.

Closed Requisition: A requisition that has been filled or closed for other reasons.

Core Competencies: The knowledge and skills that are essential to the job role.

Hard Skills: Skills, experience, or qualifications that are easily quantified. Examples; Certified Public Accountant, Python programming expertise, licensed EMT.

Soft Skills: Behavioral traits necessary to perform the job responsibilities. Examples; leadership, creative problem solving, conflict resolution.

ApplicantStack Manages Job Requisitions

Yes, we have a tool for that, too! The job requisition workflow automates the approval process. Assign tasks to the appropriate members of the hiring team. Complete and document each step in a centralized location. ApplicantStack brings transparency and accountability to your requisition process. When a requisition is approved, the open position seamlessly transitions to the next workflow in the hiring stage.

You can try out the ApplicantStack job requisition function (and all the integrated hiring workflows) free for 15 days.

By Liz Strikwerda

16 Top HR Influencers You Should Be Following

16 Top HR Influencers You Should Be Following

In order for HR directors to cope with contemporary challenges, they need current information. Since HR spans multiple disciplines, it can be a full-time job keeping up. We’ve rounded up the best minds in the industry so you don’t have to.

16 HR Influencers You Should Be Following

1. Ward Christman

Twitter @HRTechAdvisor  LinkedIn

Chief Advisor at HR Tech Advisor, Co-Founder @HRTechAlliances

As an applicant tracking system software company, we follow Christman closely. He has over 20 years experience advising e-recruiting vendors. But you don’t need to be an ATS provider to benefit from his guidance. Check out his LinkedIn page where he lists 15 areas of business expertise. Any startup or established company can profit from his knowledge.

 

2. Glen Cathey

Twitter @GlenCathey  LinkedIn

Recruiting, Sourcing, Strategy, Innovation, Ethical AI, Data/Analytics, Search/Match, Lean, Agile, Social Engineering. Speaker, Blogger, INTJ, He/Him

Glen’s Twitter bio line (listed above) reflects his breadth of experience. If you have an applicant tracking system, you are employing technology he helped to develop. When you read his blogs, it’s easy to see why he advises the experts.

 

3. Sharlyn Lauby

Twitter @sharlyn_lauby  LinkedIn

Author, Speaker, Blogger, HR Consultant
Founder of HR Bartender, President of ITM Group Inc.

The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) named HR Bartender one of the top 5 HR blogs. Lauby posts several times a week, writing about topics that span the HR world and beyond. She’s also the president of ITM Group Inc., a training and human resources consulting firm. She has written books on recruiting, effective meetings, leadership training, and employee engagement.

 

4. Jon Ingham

Twitter @joningham LinkedIn

Author, Keynote Speaker, People and Organization Development Strategist

Jon Ingham is a global thought leader on values-based HCM and HR technology. Millions of people visit his blog, Strategic HCM, every week. His 2006 book ‘Strategic Human Capital Management: Creating Value through People’ has never been more relevant and should be required reading for any HR director.

 

5. Trish McFarlane

Twitter @TrishMcFarlane  LinkedIn

Blogger, Podcaster, Speaker
CEO and Analyst for H3 HR Advisors, CEO/Co-Founder of HRevolutionize, LLP
Author of HR Ringleader Blog

Trish McFarlane has worked in public relations, public accounting, IT, and healthcare. You can catch Trish on her podcast which she co-hosts with Steve Boese (featured below). You can also follow her on Twitter where she has 43K+ followers. She advises on social media, leadership, change management, training, and performance management. If you work for a large firm that’s growing quickly, it’s worth your while to tap her knowledge.

 

6. Steve Boese

Twitter @SteveBoese  LinkedIn

Blogger, Podcaster, Tech Columnist
Co-Chair of Human Resource Executive’s HR Technology Conference

Steve Boese’s HR Happy Hour Show, has been the most downloaded HR podcast since it was launched in 2009. He’s is also Human Resource Executive’s inside tech columnist. If your HR position requires a lot of IT acumen, Steve is a great resource.

 

7. Jim Knight

Twitter @KnightSpeaker  LinkedIn

Keynote Speaker, Author, Risk-Taker

Jim Knight’s ‘Culture That Rocks: How to Revolutionize Your Company’s Culture,’ is a bible for HR directors tasked with strengthening their company culture. Since the 90’s, he has been a trendsetter on training, development, and team building. He is active on Twitter where he cranks the fun factor up to eleven.

 

8. Suzanne Lucas

Twitter @RealEvilHRLady  LinkedIn

Blogger, Speaker, Twitter Personality
Creator of EvilHRLady

Suzanne Lucas’ EvilHRLady is legendary in the HR blogosphere for her unique insight and biting wit. Do a quick search on her blog on any HR topic. Chances are, you’ll find several articles in her extensive library of posts. Or join her 27K+ Twitter followers and see what all the buzz is about.

 

9. Jacob Morgan

Twitter @jacobm  LinkedIn

Author, Keynote Speaker, Futurist
Co-founder of The Future of Work Community

As a self-described ‘futurist,’ Jacob Morgan is the co-founder of The Future of Work Community. If your company wants to radically transform the employee experience, listen to Jacob’s weekly podcast. He talks to corporate leaders whose organizations are disrupting the workplace. Only have five minutes? Subscribe to his YouTube series ‘The Future in 5’ for a quick shot of inspiration.

 

10. Laurie McCabe

Twitter @lauriemccabe  LinkedIn

IT Analyst, Blogger
Co-Founder and Partner at SMB Group

Are you the owner or HR director of an SMB? More interested in the practical than the theoretical? Laurie McCabe delivers pragmatic advice you can act on right now. She’s the Co-Founder of SMB Group, where she helps business owners unlock value from technology. McCabe was recognized as a 2018 Fit Small Business top influencer. For the past ten years, her blog has contained a goldmine of IT and general business management wisdom.

 

11. William Tincup

Twitter @williamtincup LinkedIn

Writer, Speaker, Advisor, Consultant, Investor, Storyteller & Teacher
President of Recruiting Daily

William may be one of the most prolific podcasters in the industry, with over 1000 podcasts to his credit. If you are an entrepreneur, there is no one better to follow. His experience extends well beyond the world of HR.

 

12. Bill Treasurer

Twitter @btreasurer   LinkedIn

Speaker, Author, Consultant
CEO of Giant Leap Consulting

Bill Treasurer has written multiple bestsellers about courage and leadership. He has also advised NASA, CNN, the Centers for Disease Control, and the U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs. If you feel like you’ve hit a career plateau, Bill’s your man.

 

13. Josh Bersin

Twitter @Josh_Bersin  LinkedIn

Research Analyst, Public Speaker, Author
Founder of Bersin by Deloitte

Bersin by Deloitte conducts global research in human resources and HR technology. Bersin writes about global trends in leadership and talent management technology. If you are concerned about employee experience at your organization, check out Bersin’s The Employee Experience Platform: A New Category Arrives. Last month, he launched The Josh Bersin Academy, billed as the the first global development academy for HR and talent professionals.

 

14. John Sumser

Twitter @JohnSumser  LinkedIn

Author, Adviser
Principal Analyst for HRExaminer

Before you invest in HR software, consult John Sumser’s online magazine, the HR Examiner. It’s the premier authority on HCM technology. No one has a more impressive history in the field. Consider this: Sumser had a PC in 1981 and an email account in 1982. In the 90’s, he documented the first online job boards—when the internet itself was a novelty. If you are trying to tame your processes so you can take a high-level strategic view, you couldn’t have a better guide.

 

15. Katrina Collier

Twitter @KatrinaMCollier LinkedIn

Candidate Engagement Author, Keynote Speaker
Founder of DisruptHR London, Bristol, Cambridge, York & Glasgow and The Searchologist

If you are struggling to differentiate your recruitment marketing from your competitors, you need Collier’s best-selling The Robot-Proof Recruiter. It is one of the best books on improving the candidate experience and thereby boosting response rates.

 

16. Meghan Biro

Twitter @MeghanMBiro LinkedIn

Speaker, Author, Podcaster, Talent Management Leader
Founder and CEO of TalentCulture Consulting Group

Meghan Biro launched the blog TalentCulture in 2008. At TalentCulture, you can find articles and podcasts about recruiting, social business, workplace culture, career strategy, leadership, and HR tech. Meghan draws on her experience advising Microsoft, Google, and IBM and other global giants.

How to Ensure Compliance with Company Policies

How to Ensure Compliance with Company Policies

Company policies protect your business from frivolous lawsuits. They are designed to give equal opportunities to all employees, to create a safe work environment, and to inform workers about what they can expect from the leadership team. But even the most well-meaning corporate policies are useless if they aren’t followed consistently and to the letter. Follow these steps to ensure compliance.

1. Create Policies

Do you have company policies? You need to be proactive. Don’t just assume you can come up with coherent, fair policies on the fly as situations arise. If you don’t have policies in place, your HR team needs to make this a priority. Solicit input from managers, but your human resources department has the final say in the policy-making process. You want to create policies that will be best for your company. That might, at times, conflict with what your employees will want.

You should have policies to cover:

  • Holidays, vacations, sick days, and personal leave
  • Performance evaluations and improvement
  • Equal Employment Opportunity
  • Employee classifications
  • Payment schedules, including advances, deductions, and overtime
  • Meals and breaks
  • Terminations

There are several additional policies you may want to create. Will you allow concealed weapons at your place of work? Will you conduct background checks or drug tests on applicants or employees? What is the procedure if one employee accuses another of bullying or harassment? Can employees bring pets to work? Knowing how you’ll proceed before a heated issue comes up helps to ensure compliance because it sets expectations.

2. Spread Awareness

If no one knows what the policies are, it’s impossible to ensure compliance. A full, detailed list of your policies should be readily accessible at all times. Print out a binder and leave it in the employee break room. Give each new hire a hard and digital copy of corporate policies when he or she is hired. Most importantly, go over the policies to verify that the employee understands and agrees to abide by each one. Ignorance should never be an excuse for not following a corporate policy.

Incorporate your corporate policies into your onboarding process. Go beyond uploading the documents to your onboarding software. Your software should allow you to schedule to-do lists for your new hires, and show you whether or not these tasks have been completed. Don’t just make your company policies mandatory reading material. Create a quiz or questionnaire that prompts employees to share their thoughts about policies. It will be good feedback for you, and it will give new hires the chance to really consider each policy and its potential impact.

3. Lead by Example

Compliance starts at the top. If your managers are taking extended lunch breaks, using company property for personal business, or posting unauthorized updates on social media, your employees will either follow suit or become disillusioned with their leadership. Corporate policies are for everyone, from the CEO to the college intern. If anyone in the company doesn’t follow policy, others will believe that they don’t have to, either. Inconsistency is the biggest danger to successful implementation of your corporate policies.

Consistency is about more than trying to ensure compliance. If an employee ever decides to file a lawsuit against your business, precedents will be a part of that lawsuit. Did you follow every HR policy to the letter, or have you been making exceptions for some? This doesn’t mean that you need to blindly enforce your policies. A salaried employee, for example, may not be subject to the same strict rules as an hourly temp. But document any discrepancies and your reasoning behind them to protect the company should an employee file suit.

4. Be Reasonable

You don’t necessarily need to create a hard and fast rule for everything. You should be proactive and have some sort of general guideline for most scenarios, though. If you’re not sure about a certain policy, don’t exclude it from your corporate policies altogether. Instead, note that this situation “will be handled according to the manager’s discretion.” This leaves the door open for you to change policies later on if they don’t seem right for your business.

5. Follow the Law

There are certain policies every business needs to have in place according to federal law. Review your corporate policies with an attorney to ensure compliance with OSHA, labor laws, and other acts. Remember, your company policies are more than a guide or a handbook. In a court of law, they are typically treated as a contract between an employer and its employees. This is not something you want to put off until a situation arises. Create and ensure compliance with corporate policies now to avoid trouble in the future.

Top 10 Benefits of an Applicant Tracking System (ATS)

Top 10 Benefits of an Applicant Tracking System (ATS)

Whether you are trying to “sell” an applicant tracking system to your management team or CEO, or you are looking to find a better way of managing your candidates and resumes, here are the top 10 benefits of an Applicant Tracking System .

1. Publish your jobs across multiple third party job boards as well as your public job board

With a few clicks, you can post a position to major job boards like Indeed, Google Jobs, LinkedIn Limited Postings, Glassdoor, JuJu, Monster, CareerBuilder, as well as social media sites (LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter). Have consistent, branded job postings across job boards and your own website.

2. Enable Candidates to Quickly and Easily Apply for Jobs

 This might sound straightforward, but creating an easy and accessible application will allow candidates to quickly and easily apply to your organization. In today’s competitive market, having an ATS will enable you to appeal to the maximum number of qualified candidates.

3. Manage Candidates all in one place and manage the entire recruiting process via your custom workflow

Gone are the days of trying to manage multiple email folders and Excel spreadsheets. Using an ATS allows you to customize your workflow to match your current process.

4. Quickly Identify the Best Candidates and don’t waste time on those that are not a fit

Use pre-screener questions to quickly knock-out unqualified candidates and to prioritize the best ones using automatic scoring. Then systematically review interviewer feedback to focus on high-priority candidates so you can quickly make offers.

5. Automate Routine Tasks

Send notifications to candidates. Schedule interviews. Gather interview feedback. Rate candidates. An ATS can automate all of these functions and more, enabling recruiters to the highest value-added activities.

6. Enhance Reporting and Compliance

Keep management up-to-date on the candidate pipelines for each job and effectiveness of different job boards. Easily capture, track, and report voluntary EEO data, while remaining in compliance with the guidelines set forth by the EEO/OFCCP.

7. Streamline Employee Onboarding

Once a candidate has accepted an offer, automatically move them through the onboarding process. Use the system to ensure the completion of paperwork, scheduling of required initial meetings, set-up of IT services, and more!

8. Your New Employees Virtual Assistant

A hire portal with username and password allows for a secure portal for your new employees to see all relevant information and see all tasks assigned to him or her.

9. Eliminate all Employee Onboarding Paperwork

Easily assign all new hire paperwork such as state and federal tax forms, health plans, employee manuals, training videos, etc. Have the new employee complete and sign all items online.

10. Improve Communication & Reduce Friction

No more chasing down interviewers to schedule interviews or gather feedback. Don’t worry about notifying candidates. Easily provide status updates to management. Let the ATS do it!

 

New Employee Onboarding Checklist [Updated 2019]

New Employee Onboarding Checklist [Updated 2019]

Onboarding a new employee can be quite challenging and time-consuming.  Every phase of the employee onboarding process is important, so make sure to have a new hire checklist to onboard your new employee.  You can use the following outline as a guide, however, every organization will have its own unique requirements.  These tasks will need to be adjusted for the type of employment (full time, part time, seasonal), but having an initial, general list will provide a good starting point for different positions.  We have outlined a new employee onboarding checklist to make it less daunting.

Step 1:

Create a list of tasks that new employees will need to complete and that current team members will need to work on/setup prior to the new employees first day.  Example tasks to put on new hire checklist could include, but are not limited to:

Prepare any State & Federal tax forms that need to be completed.  Some of these forms might require input from multiple individuals.  Having a system in place where these can be created and completed online can save time and resources.  The ability to upload these forms form a library can be beneficial to any busy HR professional.

Prepare any job-related forms that will need to be completed and/or signed by the employee or current team member.  Having a system in place to easily upload and create fillable forms can make this task much easier.

Gather any health insurance forms and benefits information

Identify any computer or other peripheral needs that need to be set up prior to the employee arriving on the first-day

Order any technology equipment

Order phone and create new extension

Obtain a new photo ID

Order business cards

Order any materials/supplies needed by the new employee

Make any arrangements for parking/transportation

Add new employee to relevant email lists

Identify any socialization tasks such as a tour of facilities or welcome lunch/meeting

Step 2:

Put together any supporting documents and links to any videos.  These should be items that do not require any input or signatures.  Example supporting documents might be included on a new hire checklist include, but are not limited to:

Welcome message for new employees

Contact namesNew Hire checklist - library

Phone/extension list

Any training material or videos that will need to be watched

Benefit packages to review

 

Step 3:

Assign tasks from the new employee onboarding checklist to current team members and new hires.  An automated process for task reminders is an invaluable tool.  Having the ability to set deadlines with reminders will ensure that the tasks will get done.  It is also helpful to be able to visually see the progress indicators that show any outstanding tasks.

Assign all tasks to any relevant person with a due datenew hire checklist - checklist

Order assignments according to time needed to complete tasks and dependencies between tasks

Create email remainders

Monitor completion of tasks on the new hire checklist

Step 4:

Establish clear communication with the new hire.  Having an employee portal to facilitate the new hire checklist can make this much easier.  An employee portal can be viewed as their own virtual assistant that can help the onboarding process run smoothly.  Here are some items to include when using a portal:

Their manager’s contact information

List of tasks from the new hire checklist

Any materials that they need to review and/or sign (from Steps 1 & 2) A progress indicator and list of deadlines to help the new hire complete all the tasks

Step 5:

Review your plan and make necessary tweaks for the next employee.  Don’t assume that one new hire checklist is going to fit all employees!  Luckily fully-automated tools such as ApplicantStack Onboard allow for on the fly updates and customizations.

Ready to implement your new employee onboarding checklist? Download a copy of our checklist here:

New Employee Onboarding Checklist