Do You Want To Increase Workforce Diversity? 13 Top Tips For Diversity Hiring

Do You Want To Increase Workforce Diversity? 13 Top Tips For Diversity Hiring

‘Diversity hiring’ is a hot topic in the recruiting industry.

Companies are dedicating more resources to increasing diversity. Working to achieve demographic parity is not just the right thing to do. It’s the best thing to do from a business standpoint.

A diverse workforce has a greater depth of experience, knowledge. and skills. It’s more productive and quicker to innovate. A team that includes multiple demographics can serve clients from multiple demographics. It’s impossible to introduce a product into a foreign market if you don’t have employees who understand the culture.

Firms That Increase Diversity Grow Faster

Consider this study by BCG:

Companies with above-average diversity on their management teams had higher innovation revenue. 19 percentage points higher than companies with below-average leadership diversity. 45% of total revenue versus just 26%.

Note that this study involved leadership teams. That underscores the importance of increasing diversity at the highest levels. If you focus only on entry-level positions, you won’t experience the same benefits.

Here are ApplicantStack’s 13 tips for your diversity hiring efforts:

1. Assess Your Current Workforce

Identify the makeup of your workforce. Consider gender, ethnicity, and geographic location (if you have remote workers). Plus age and educational background.

If you don’t use remote workers, why not? Do you have job positions that could be performed remotely? Say, another country? Widen your hiring pool to include people all over the world. This is a quick way to get diverse job seekers to apply.

2. Make a Goal for Diversity Hiring

Pick one underrepresented group. Make a goal to increase your target hires by X amount in X months. When you’ve reached that goal, move on to the second category.

3. Write a Diversity Statement

Articulate your diversity policies and goals. Include it in your employee handbook and hiring team training materials. Put this statement on every piece of recruiting communication. This means your job requisition, job description, job posting, and careers page. Use it on internal documents so it’s always top of mind for your employees.

4. Make it a Company-Wide Initiative

Involve your workforce. Let your employees know about your diversity hiring goals. If you use an HR portal, remind your employees of your hiring values frequently when they clock in. Seek their input to create and carry out your plan.

5. Is Your Hiring Team Diverse?

Does your hiring team include minorities? Are job applicants interviewed by people from all demographics? Applicants will notice. If minority candidates have several jobs to choose from, the makeup of the interview team could be a factor in their decision.

6. Scrutinize Your Hiring Process

Hiring processes are complex. There are multiple touch points in the applicant journey. Dissect each step. An applicant tracking system (ATS) helps you understand each step in the workflow. An ATS stores all candidate communications and recruitment marketing. You can easily run reports on hiring demographics. An ATS makes it easier to create an inclusive candidate journey.

7. Rework Your Job Descriptions

Do you use gender-neutral terminology in your descriptions? Scrutinize your job descriptions and take out any gender-specific language. Instead of ‘he’ use ‘he or she’ or ‘s/he’. You can always use the job title in place of any pronoun.

Remove masculine language. Many words used frequently in job postings discourage women from applying.  Here is a free gender decoder tool you can use. Just paste in your job description.

If your job description templates are stored in an ATS, it makes it easier to prevent problem words and phrasing.

8. Use Structured Interviewing

Ensure your interviewers use a script that has been carefully written to avoid bias. Train your interviewers to use it correctly. Manage your structured interviewing scripts in your ATS.

9. Decrease Bias in Candidate Filtering

If ‘corporate culture match’ is a hiring criterion, remove it. This is an easy place for unconscious bias to creep in. The goal is to eliminate subjective judgments.

10. Seek Diverse Referrals

An employee referral program is a great hiring tool for many reasons. If you have a referral program, use it in your diversity plan.

Our closest associates are likely from our same demographic group. When moving outward in our network, however, we find more diversity. Talk about this with your employees. Ask them to consciously look for referrals from your target groups.

Pinterest created a program designed to increase the diversity in their engineering teams. They asked their engineers to refer potential job applicants from target demographics. They discovered that if their employees made a conscious effort, they could find referrals from underrepresented groups. Pinterest’s diversity referral program was a success. They are taking additional steps to increase diversity in other departments.

11. Improve Onboarding

You might wonder what onboarding has to do with diversity hiring. It comes after a candidate accepts the job, after all. The reason onboarding is key is because good onboarding reduces turnover. Hiring more employees from inadequately represented groups is the first step. Retaining them is the second step. Look at the employees who have quit your company in the last five years. Identify whether minorities or women have shorter tenure. If they do, you’ve got additional problems. Your corporate culture may not be welcoming to workers from underrepresented groups.

The topic of turnover leads me to my next section.

12. Use Exit Interviews

Hopefully, you don’t have a lot of employees quitting. If you do, use exit interviews to learn why they are leaving. You may discover you have problems with your managers. Perhaps your company doesn’t support work/life balance. Maybe there are few opportunities for advancement. Are your advancement policies discriminatory? Find out what’s going on and fix it.

13. Do Your Benefits Benefit…Everyone?

Does your company support employees in different life stages? Do you offer flexible schedules? Do you support working mothers and fathers? If your benefits are designed for a homogenous workforce, it will hamper your efforts.

The team at ApplicantStack wishes you success as you pursue your diversity hiring goals.

By Liz Strikwerda

How Can You Improve Your Job Requisition Approval Process?

How Can You Improve Your Job Requisition Approval Process?

Improve your hiring outcomes by improving your job requisition process.

Let’s discuss how.

What’s a Job Requisition?

When a department manager needs to hire a new employee, they submit a job requisition.

A job requisition starts the hiring process. With the requisition, the department manager asks for approval for the new employee. If the requisition is denied, the process doesn’t go any further. The denied requisition is stored in the HR software.

The job requisition standardizes the process of filling a position. Applicant tracking systems (ATS) have templates for creating job requisitions. Plus tools to manage the approval process.

A job requisition includes the following:

  • Requisition reference number
  • Job title
  • Type of employment (full-time, temporary, contract, etc.)
  • Name of hiring manager making the request
  • Job description
  • Department or team the employee will be a part of
  • Salary, hourly wage, or pay grade, benefits
  • Type of position: new hire or replacement
  • Hiring budget approval
  • Fill/start date
  • Whether the job description is new or existing

Why Is It Important To Have a Formal Job Requisition Process?

Human Resources professionals understand the importance of standardization. Formalizing and documenting is vital for end-to-end processes and all the sub-steps.

The job requisition process is no different. And the fact that it comes first is not insignificant. Any multi-step operation needs to start on the right foot. Otherwise, it will need to be corrected down the line. At that point, you’ve wasted time and money.

Few things are as important as the quality of the employees on your team. Formalization ensures the process is done correctly. It sets expectations for everyone involved. And you can’t improve a process until you identify exactly what is going on.

Let’s talk about best practices for creating job requisitions.

How Do I Write a Job Requisition?

1. Follow The Approval Process

Job requisitions may need to be approved by Human Resources. In some companies, upper management needs to sign off on new positions. Follow your company policies before proceeding.

2. Justify The Need

Why do you need a new employee? Is it a new position? Is it because someone quit or was promoted? How is the position tied to KPIs? Make a timeline for the job responsibilities. Define exactly what is expected.

3. Write a Good Job Description

A job description is a detailed listing of required qualifications and experience, job duties, and other necessary information about the position. It also includes the salary range, benefits, and information about the company.

Will the requisition be filled by an outside recruiting agency? Remember that they don’t have your institutional knowledge. Include all the necessary details.

We cover how to create a job description thoroughly in our How To Hire Your Perfect Employee Series. Follow the steps to write a spot-on description for your requisition.

Job Requisition Glossary

If you are new to the hiring process, it’s helpful to understand the HR-speak as it relates to job requisitions.

Open Requisition: An active requisition that hasn’t been filled or closed.

Closed Requisition: A requisition that has been filled or closed for other reasons.

Core Competencies: The knowledge and skills that are essential to the job role.

Hard Skills: Skills, experience, or qualifications that are easily quantified. Examples; Certified Public Accountant, Python programming expertise, licensed EMT.

Soft Skills: Behavioral traits necessary to perform the job responsibilities. Examples; leadership, creative problem solving, conflict resolution.

ApplicantStack Manages Job Requisitions

Yes, we have a tool for that, too! The job requisition workflow automates the approval process. Assign tasks to the appropriate members of the hiring team. Complete and document each step in a centralized location. ApplicantStack brings transparency and accountability to your requisition process. When a requisition is approved, the open position seamlessly transitions to the next workflow in the hiring stage.

You can try out the ApplicantStack job requisition function (and all the integrated hiring workflows) free for 15 days.

By Liz Strikwerda

Torn Between Two Equally-Desirable Candidates? How To Choose The Right One

Torn Between Two Equally-Desirable Candidates? How To Choose The Right One

One of the most challenging parts of recruitment is the endless search for talent. Since the current market favors the job-seeker, it’s more difficult than ever to attract top applicants to your company. That’s why the idea of two prime candidates competing for a position sounds unlikely – but it does happen.

Getting your pick of the litter sounds like a nice problem to have, but the pressure can be nerve-wracking. In the end, you’ll have to turn away an applicant that you would’ve hired under any other circumstance. And there’s a chance you end up rejecting the better option of the two.

So, how do you ensure your pick is the right one? Here are four strategies:

1. Determine their desire

While the interview process helps you determine who you want at your company, it might distract you from an equally important question: Who wants your company?

The more promising a candidate is, the more potential they have. It’s very likely they’re looking at multiple companies, not just yours. Sadly, a candidate might not stick around for long if your company’s at the bottom of their list. They might not even accept the job offer to begin with.

An applicant tracking software (ATS) solution can help you find out who’s more committed to your company. This software keeps track of who’s opening your emails and clicking on your links. It also records the amount of time candidates take to respond to emails and complete application materials.

Candidate engagement translates to a candidate’s desire to work at your company. Prompt responses imply that the candidate will be just as eager in the workplace. And they’ll be less likely to jump ship without reason. Having an idea of where you rank on each candidate’s list of options can help streamline a difficult decision process.

2. Consider cultural fit

Don’t let a candidate’s stellar qualifications distract you from other relevant considerations, like their alignment with your corporate culture. Remember: A good worker isn’t always a good teammate.

Both candidates may have perfect interviewing skills and brilliant credentials, but that doesn’t mean they’ll get along with your staff. A better cultural fit can be the distinguishing factor that elevates one qualified candidate over the other.

Get the team involved in the hiring process. This could take the form of a lunch, happy hour or just a simple meet and greet with the candidates. These social gatherings help bring out the personality traits each candidate would be adding to the office dynamic. As a bonus, you can ask your employees who they prefer.

An alternative is to look up each candidate’s social media accounts. A candidate’s social media can reveal a number of behavioral warning signs that you might’ve missed otherwise.

3. Put those skills to the test

You already know that both candidates have the necessary skills, but maybe one uses them more effectively.

So, let them prove themselves to you with a skills test. Have each candidate try their hand at some essential job duties. Or run them through some real work scenarios and compare their responses with how your existing employees have handled similar situations in the past.

When you put two equally qualified candidates to the test, you might get different outcomes, which can help set apart one candidate just enough for you to decide.

4. Look for holes in your workforce

With two ideal candidates, you get the luxury of probing deeper than just a few interview questions. One way to take advantage of this opportunity is to size up the candidates in reference to your existing staff. A few questions to consider:

  • Is the workforce lacking, even a little, in any area?
  • Is there any overlap in qualifications that aren’t required for the job?
  • Could the employees benefit from a certain type of person?

These questions can help you pick one candidate over the other based on the differences. Perhaps your staff needs a leader – pick the candidate with more higher-level experience. Maybe every single employee has leadership skills. Your company probably won’t benefit from another employee with the same qualities – hiring someone with a different strength would enhance the staff more.

Looking for these gaps in your team can help you decide on the candidate that’ll be the best asset to the team.

 

About the Author: Amanda Wright is a content writer for Better Buys, helping companies to find the right b2b software solutions. She enjoys writing about the intersection of business and technology.

Want To Work In Recruitment? Do You Need A Recruiting/HR Certification?

Want To Work In Recruitment? Do You Need A Recruiting/HR Certification?

Preparing for a career in recruitment? Trying to make sense of recruitment certifications?

Recruiting and Human Resources professionals take surprisingly divergent routes. There really isn’t a recognized ‘right way’ to do it.

Some enter the profession from a business management background. Others transfer from sales or even sociology.

But if you’re starting out—as opposed to moving into recruiting mid-career—what’s the best way to get there?

PHR or SHRM

There are two organizations you need to know about; SHRM (Society for Human Resource Management) and HRCI (Human Resources Certification Institute).

HRCI

HRCI used to be part of SHRM. In 2014, SHRM quit offering PHR certification. SHRM started offering its own certifications.

There isn’t a consensus in the HR industry on which certification is better. Ask a roomful of HR pros and you will spark a heated discussion. There are strong opinions in both camps. I’m not going to recommend one over the other. Suffice to say, if you want to be a professional recruiter, get either your PHR or SHRM. Note that you need a Bachelor’s Degree first. A Master’s is even better. Also, to be eligible to take the exams, you need some HR experience. The requirements vary depending on the certification.

HRCI offers the PHR (Professional in Human Resources) and related certifications. HRCI has designed the PHR to ‘demonstrate your mastery of the technical and operational aspects of HR management, including U.S. laws and regulations.’

The topics covered and their respective weighting is as follows:

  • Workforce planning and employment (25%)
  • Employee and labor relations (20%)
  • Compensation and benefits (19%)
  • HR development (18%)
  • Business management and strategy (11%)
  • Risk management (8%)

HRCI offers several related credentials:

  • aPHR Associate Professional in Human Resources
  • PHRca Professional in Human Resources — California
  • PHRi Professional in Human Resources International
  • SPHR Senior Professional in Human Resources
  • SPHRi Senior Professional in Human Resources International
  • GPHR Global Professional in Human Resources

SHRM

Let’s talk about the SHRM credentials.

  • SHRM-CP Society for Human Resource Management Certified Professional
  • SHRM-SCP Society for Human Resource Management Senior Certified Professional

SHRM organizes eight behavioral competencies into three areas as follows:

  1. Leadership (Leadership & Navigation, Ethical Practice)
  2. Interpersonal (Relationship Management, Communication, Global and Cultural Effectiveness)
  3. Business (Business Acumen, Consultation, Critical Evaluation)

According to SHRM, their certifications are designed to measure practical application of HR knowledge with questions based on ‘on-the-job scenarios and realistic work situations.’

When you have your general HR certification, you can consider recruiting-specific training. There are many good options, depending on your career goals.

Recruiting Certifications

AIRS Alliance of Information and Referral Systems

  • CIR Certified Internet Recruiter
  • ACIR Advanced Certified Internet Recruiter
  • CDR Certified Diversity and Inclusion Recruiter
  • CSSR Certified Social Sourcing Recruiter
  • PRC Professional Recruiter Certification
  • CSMR Certified Social Media Recruiter
  • CMVR Certified Military Veteran Recruiter
  • ECRE Elite Certified Recruitment Expert

NAPS National Association of Personnel Services

  • CPC Certified Personnel Consultant
  • CTS Certified Temporary Staffing-Specialist

CPSP The People Sourcing Certification

  • CPSP-1, CPSP-2 Certified People Sourcing Professional

The Sourcing Institute

  • TSI Levels: Member, Specialist, Professional, Leadership, Leadership Only

Social Talent: Social Talent Internet Recruitment Certifications

Learn from their short 2-3 minute videos at your own pace.

  • Social Talent Internet Recruitment Certifications: Orange Belt, Blue Belt, Brown Belt, Black Belt

What Are The Benefits of Recruiting Certifications?

Gaining more career knowledge is always good. When choosing which certification to pursue, identify your primary goal. Do you want to get a promotion at your current company? If the recruiting positions are in high demand, a certification can give you an edge. A certification is helpful if you want to transfer from general HR to a recruiting position. Or perhaps you simply want additional skills to perform your job better.

Another thing to consider is the type of recruiting position you are seeking. Each recruiting certification has a specific area of focus. Here are the most common recruiting positions:

  • Talent Acquisition Manager
  • External Recruiter
  • Executive Recruiter
  • Internal, Inhouse, or Corporate Recruiter

Emerging Careers in Recruitment

  • Diversity Hiring
  • Recruitment Analytics
  • Candidate Experience Specialist
  • Online Recruiting Specialist

Are you currently an HR generalist (or working in another field) and want to transfer to a recruiting position? Your experience may line up with one of the newest positions in the recruitment industry. For example, if you are currently working in digital marketing, you could apply your experience as an Online Recruiting Specialist. If you are a Data Analyst, you could move into a Recruitment Analytics position.

By Liz Strikwerda

How To Create A Yearly Hiring Plan

How To Create A Yearly Hiring Plan

Does your company currently hire on an as-needed basis? For example, when the workload becomes unsustainable, you begin a candidate search. When someone quits, you dust off the job description and start posting.

With a de facto reactive system, you are always playing catch up. It slows production. It lowers the quality of onboarding and job training.

If this is the case for your organization, we encourage you to create a yearly hiring plan.

What Is A Yearly Hiring Plan?

A hiring plan is a comprehensive strategy. It aligns hiring resources with business goals and long-term staffing needs.

How Will A Yearly Hiring Help My Company?

A good hiring plan ensures continuous business operations. When you anticipate talent needs, you can take the time to find the perfect employee for each position. You can plan better for onboarding, training, and mentoring. A carefully sourced hire adds value sooner than a panic hire.

Filling positions quickly prevents existing employees from being buried with extra work. Team members are less likely to become burned out. This protects you from overworked employees quitting.

Let’s recap the benefits of a yearly hiring plan:

  • Prevent lapses in production
  • Ensure steady business growth
  • Unhurried recruitment results in higher quality hires
  • Prevent burnout and turnover due to understaffing
  • Anticipate onboarding and training needs
  • Reduce stress on the hiring team
  • Stay within your hiring budget

How Do I Create A Yearly Hiring Plan?

  1. Assess current workforce
  2. Outline business growth goals
  3. Identify talent needs
  4. Evaluate current hiring processes
  5. Create a timeline for hiring
  6. Align hiring practices and resources with needs

1. Interview Stakeholders

First, gather information from everyone. This means the executive team, managers, and several rank and file employees. Be methodical and thorough.

Interview each manager about each position in depth. This is how you can identify skills gaps. Find out if the current hires are a good fit. If they aren’t, you need to improve your hiring process. Consult our series How To Hire Your Perfect Next Employee.

Talk to members of the executive team about the business strategy. Which new job roles will be necessary? Once you have finished your plan, you will need to circle back if the hiring budget is too low. At that point, you will have justification for requesting an increase.

If your company is too large to talk to everyone in person, create a survey. If you use an HR portal, post a link to a questionnaire on the HR interface.

Talk to current employees about the quality of onboarding and training. Take a pulse on workforce morale. Find out if the day-to-day work has met their expectations.

2. Assess Your Workforce

  • What skills does your team possess?
  • What skills will you need?
  • Are there positions you want to fill internally with promotions or additional training?
  • How many new employees will you need?
  • What is the overall turnover rate? What is the rate per team and/or job role?
  • Will changing dynamics affect turnover?

3. Evaluate Your Hiring Process

  • Is it working?
  • Are you hiring quality employees?
  • Are you filling positions in a timely manner?

4. Hiring Resources

  • What is your hiring budget?
  • Will it be adequate for upcoming hiring needs?
  • What is your cost-per-hire?
  • Can you reduce cost-per-hire without lowering hiring outcomes?
  • Do you need to upgrade your recruiting software?

You can’t chart a course without knowing where you are right now. The first step in creating a plan is identifying your current situation. Interview as necessary and answer the questions outlined previously. Identify actionable steps. Now you will document your findings.

Your Yearly Hiring Plan

  1. Positions to be filled
  2. Detailed timeline
  3. Hiring operations: designate tasks for hiring team members, managers, and HR
  4. Adjust onboarding and training programs based on needs

Use ApplicantStack To Meet Your Hiring Goals

Do you have capable recruiting software? Pairing a top applicant tracking system with a long-term hiring plan is the solution.

Are you a new hiring manager or HR director? Has your company never had a formal hiring plan?

Follow the steps outlined to create a yearly plan. Use ApplicantStack to execute it. ApplicantStack helps you recruit quality candidates in the shortest time possible. Secure yourself a place at the decision-making table. Pat yourself on the back.

By Liz Strikwerda